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Anonymous
05-03-2004, 02:37 AM
I have been a public school teacher in Canada for almost 14 years. I have many questions about Home schooling. Why have you chosen it? What happens to your child when they get to high school age- don't they have to go to get a diploma? Can they go to college/ University without grades? Do they even get grades? I am not educated AT ALL about Homeschooling and I would like to know the pro's and con's. Have all of you pulled your children from public schools and if so why? Are the rules different in Canada than in the US? Enlighten me, if you have the time!
Jennifer:)

Anonymous
05-03-2004, 07:03 AM
Hello, Jennifer! Well, the group of ladies here really have a STRONG opinion about HS'ing! You will find that we HS because of a variety of reasons. These may include lousy public schools where we are at along with not having the finances for private, the desire to disciple our children in our faith (the main reason for my family), protection of our children (ie: the increased amount of violence in schools, teasing, "bad" influences, etc.), the realization that we CAN do it and not "give up" our children at the same time, the ability to "tailor make" our children's learning vs. the "one-size-fits-all" learning that has to happen in PS.

Regulations vary from state to state here in the U.S., though I can't speak for y'all up north. Usually, it includes notifying someone somewhere your intent to homeschool, and some kind of evaluation (usually toward the end). This might include testing or portfolio or submitting grades, again it varies by state. I personally don't give grades, but I do keep track of my older daughter's math and spelling "scores", and can tell you that she's averaging about 94% in each. But I believe that subjects such as history, etc. tend to be rather subjective as far as grading goes so I simply don't worry about it. Now, as I get into upper grades, I will probably keep closer track of such things. Generally, you will find that us HS'ers will fight like crazy against any (further) government regulations, as we feel that PS is a mess and the system needs to worry about themselves and leave us alone, as HS'ers are constantly "proving" themselves in other ways. (That's not meant as a challenge or anything, so please don't take it as such!) Most of us have lots of respect for most of the individual, hard-working teachers who try so hard to work in a system that gives them so little back-up but feel that the system itself has failed miserably.

You can give your child a diploma if you wish. While some chose to take the GED, most HS'ers don't want to because it has a "high-school drop-out" mentality associated with it, and our kids are NOT "drop-outs". Many universities will actually prefere HS kids, as they are generally more self-motivated learners, but the requirements vary from school to school.

My background, BTW, is public special ed; my DH has taught public HS for the last 15 years.

bemax3
05-03-2004, 10:44 AM
Hello Jennifer,
I am in Canada and this is our third year homeschooling. Canada is a great place to be a homeschooler..depending on your Province I would say the climate ranges from reasonable to excellent. Each Province has their own set of guidelines and available services. I am in BC so I will comment on ours.

We have zero mandatory reporting requirements other than registration with a Ministry approved body. It is simple as walking into the public school in your catchment and registering as a homeschooler. They recieve a very small amount of funds for this...I think it is 1/16th of funding for a full time student. There are also many other options. SIDES is a Distance Ed. program that provides a full curriculum and teacher services at no additional cost. If you are in the city where they are based then you can also attend field trips as well as year beginning/end celebrations. There is also NIDES and Nechako Ebus. NIDES serves a different area than SIDES. Ebus is another Distance Ed. program delivered electronically where you make your own educational plan, report online and submit work three times per year. Report cards are issued in all of these options and they are official records. All three institutions have full lending libraries. There are also currently three, with a new one opening this fall, Homelearning Link type programs. They are parent led but teacher assisted programs,often on a school site in spare classrooms. You must meet three times per year with the teacher for evaluation at a minimum. There are also many blocks of classes offered in various subjects. Ebus and Homelearners Link offer a refund of $800-$900 per full time student...half for part time. There are many other smaller options that you can register with outside of the public system. Wondertree is another example of this. Just fill out the enrollment form, they report you are enrolled and that is it. No evaluations. You also receive about $150 for supplies etc. Wondertree also has a Self Design program but you can look that one up at is lengthy to describe. The cap was lifted this year so the 500 families on the wait list will be accomodated for 2004/05. There is contact online with weekly reporting and in person if a teacher is in your area. There is also a refund of approx. $1000.

As for grades, report cards, university entrance etc. There are homelearners entering university every year without official transcripts. They apply as every other young adult would and they are being accepted!! My children have a brilliant, young piano teacher who will be starting University in the fall. Nobody in her family opened a text/workbook until grade nine age. She has two scholarships which will cover her first two years tuition. She did have to write Provincial exams these last few months but she was accepted unconditionally at our city's University. This is not unusual...there are homeschoolers being accepted in a wide range, some ivy league, post secondary institutions across North America. Many Universities are enjoying the broad range thinking that homelearners are notorious for having.

So yes, the rules are very different in Canada than the US. Homelearners can be graded and receive official report cards or not. High school can be administered at home for grades or not. We can be Distance Education learners or go it alone. There are also part time slots in public schools for homelearners. Any more questions, just fire away...

Michelle

TinaTx
05-03-2004, 02:56 PM
Welcome Jennifer!:D

We certainly like to talk about our *beliefs*! I think Jackie did a wonderful job of summing it all up:)

There have been sooooo many homeschoolers that have gone ahead of us paving the road to speak when it comes to homeschooling laws and universities that accept homeschooling children. Parents can keep and prepare portfolios to submit to colleges/universities. We do this over and over again.

I know that I homeschool both to teach my beliefs and for a tailor made curriculum. As far as what I don't know, I can hire tutors as many as I need to fit my child's learning style. I don't have to hear the word *budget crunch* :rolleyes:. I can pick the best books and materials. We have time to investigate our love for learning foreign languages, playing more musical instruments and/or writing and reading without interrruption or interference from those who do not take education seriously:D .

I like my children learning in the *real* world where they actually will have to interact with people that have different beliefs than they do. I do not feel social should be with children of the same age who are all on the same level, academically speaking.

I feel *teachable moments* come with someone of 60 to 70 years of age as opposed to 6 years of age. Its not that I don't think they need time with children of their own age, its just that in *real life* such as work and perhaps college such persons will not be their same age.

As far as testing, here in Texas, we have NO NOTHING! I like that. However, I do have my children tested. Why? Not because I believe that tests are the *end all of be all*. They are not. Its just ONE way I have of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of my curriculum. My child in second grade placed at a 6th grade level.

The one year he went to public school he was identified as gifted/talented. Is he such? Not really,imho.:) He is a just a kid that had 1:1 tutoring. I knew he was where he was at because of the attention his father and I gave him.

So now almost 5 years later in about the 4th grade, we are doing ancient history, latin, started some german, he plays the piano and is wanting to learn another musical instrument. I have 2 more behind him the same way.

Are there children that fall through the crack so to speak in homeschool? Yes, there probably are. The parents may not be taking the responsibility seriously. Shame on them!:mad: Is this true in public school as well? In all fairness I would have to say yes.:mad:

I feel though there are more homeschoolers taking their job seriously to educate than those who do not.

The face of the *typical* homeschooler is not typical anymore. It use to be only for religous zealots. Anymore we all have different faces. Some come to homeschooling without any religous affiliation at all. I think though a majority of christian homeschoolers though do have strong religious convictions. We feel that the spiritual person needs to be educated first.

I know my husband and I very much feel the responsiblity for educating the spiritual as well as academical person of the child. We feel that the responsibility falls squarely on the shoulders of the parent and not an institution.

I know speaking for myself, we did not have a bad encounter with public school. Quite the opposite. My sons ps teacher and I have remained friends in our small community.

I personally will not bash public school teachers because I feel a majority of them have strong feelings toward the education process.Just as I would not want one act by a homeschooler to judge ME I wouldn't judge ALL teachers actions or lack of action to a student pulled out for homeschoooling.

It is when I meet the *few* or perhaps a little more that think ONLY degreed individuals can do this job that I MAY feel the need to defend.

I always say people are *down on what they are not up on*.

When I can think of the CONS, I will post them:D It is a lot of hard, dedicated work. IMHO the rewards and satisfaction of saying I educated my children far outweigh any inconveniences I THINK I may have had. For sure you need to schedule*me* time.

A lot of homeschooles school year around like I do. It much easier to take a slow and steady pace when you have little ones. Homeschooling fits perfectly in real life. We can stay on a subject or skill until I feel they have mastered it. I don't need to go on because of the *one size fits all*. So my curriculuum can go up and down in each skill. Most kids are all over the map as far as skills anyway.

My background is in law, but my love is being a home educator spending all day with my children!

Stick around! I hope I didn't put you to sleep:rolleyes: :D :D

TinaTx

Brenda
05-03-2004, 05:13 PM
Jennifer,
We live in New Brunswick and are have been home schooling one of our three boys for a little more than a month now. We took him out of public school because I was tired of hitting the brick walls with his teachers and the school administrators. He was the target of bullying and only one side of it was being dealt with (it was always our son - he reacted to what was happening in his own ways because he didn't feel the teachers were doing anything to help him - I do not condone his behaviors but I do understand why he reacted the way he did). We use a Christian based teaching curriculum and are teaching him with a faith related perspective...

In NB, we do have "standards" to follow (that tell us where the child should be at the end of thier grade level), but we aren't told what curriculum we have to use, although in the guidleines there are references to certain resources that public school teachers use. With the application to home shcool, we also get a pamphlet that says that if our children aren't in public school by grade 12 they don't get a diploma - makes sense... Many parents in our area who home school, have opted to send thier children to public school for their high school years.

When we began considering home schooling last year, we looked into how this would affect University and Colleges. We were told and read in some cases that many universities will take a home schooled child over a public schooled child because thier SAT's scores were higher than the public schooled child. Probably has to do with the one on one teaching that we provide as opposed to the classroom sizes in public school (here it is at least 20+ per class). SAT's are highly recommended in children who are home schooled becuase it tests where they are academically... I'm not worried abouyt that yet - we still have a long way to go before we cross that bridge.

The only regret that I have bout home schooling is that I didn't do it sooner. I could have saved our family a lot of grief if we would have chosen it sooner. In making my comments above, please don't anyone take them the wrong way. We had a horrible experience with public school - it didn't work for us in one son's case but I still respect (for most of) the teachers... they have a tough job ahead of them. 20+ children and little help is a really challenging career...

Brenda

heatherwasp
05-03-2004, 06:04 PM
I just made the choice to homeschool and I started today. I have to say that the main factor in my decision was the current state of the ps system in my area. I have a degree in education and I love teaching. Unfortunately teachers in my area are bogged down with so much paperwork and discipline problems that they have little time for one on one interaction.

I too want my children to be educated according to the beliefs of our family and when it comes to certain issues I want to be the one to answer those questions.

JMHO but I think each family has to decide what's best for them at the time. And as far as college, I think homeschooled children have already proven themselves to be just as ready as ps kids.

Brenda
05-03-2004, 06:26 PM
Heather,
Wish you the best of luck. Home schooling is fun (for the most part) and very rewarding. The only regret I had was not starting sooner...

Brenda

Anonymous
05-03-2004, 09:06 PM
We believe one on one is more effective and that school isn't just about textbooks but about building relationships. We believe that the majority of of children's time should be spent with the parents raising them and training in them in the way they should go. We believe in character building and learning hands on, lots of field trips and providing a postive atmosphere to grow up in and not segregating our children to be with others of the same ages day in and day out...
The Christian umbrella we use will give them a diploma when they are finished with school. We report grades and pick our own cirriculums. Some states require testing, others it is optional. I know most homeschooled children excel and exceed in all they do and grow up to be sucessful business owners, leaders and people of great character. Many graduate early.
One of my daughters is not even 5 years and reading on a 4th grade level and writing 2nd grade level. We spend 1 hour a day working on phonics, reading and math total. The rest of the time explore the world around us and go to the library to check out 10 books a week. It is about making education a way of life and giving them the opportunity to have many life experiences while yet leading them in the way they should go. We are not unsocialized but rather have to limit it because there are so many things to do (sports, music classes, art, gymnastics, homeschool groups) and we have full control over it.

I don't feel the govn't needs to place generic standards to my family. My message to others is..it is okay to be different... follow your heart and let your standards be higher than society's standards. Who cares how the world measures you up ?? When you are brought up in a positive atmos. and with faith there is nothing you can't do. k

Anonymous
05-04-2004, 02:08 AM
Wow! I had no idea. As a PS teacher, I have many questions about home schooling. Don't get me wrong, I'm not against it. I feel a little confused as to why HS children are getting into colleges and Universities easily when many, many PS children have to struggle to get in. I still don't fully understand how they can go on to higher education without any "proof" of passing the standards each gov't has set. Why have PS at all then?! Not angry, just confused!
**Melanie- I too am in BC. I teach for Surrey.
Thank you to everyone who has helped to answer some of my questions. If you think of anything else you want to tell me, go ahead.
Jennifer

heatherwasp
05-04-2004, 08:33 AM
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but here in the states all colleges require either SAT scores or ACT scores for admission. Passing those tests would be the proof of mastery over various subjects.

Angel
05-04-2004, 10:00 AM
Hello,
I have a friend that was a highschool drop-out and she took the ged test. She has been accepted to a College based on her GED scores. So it isn't really an issue. As with anything else "Where there is a will there is a way"!!!! I personally have many reasons for choosing to homeschool my boys. #1 boy Is very gifted and no one has listened to me on this and he has now lost his zest for learning he once had! My #2 boy just needs the one on one attention. He has had bully problems also. I don't mean to sound as though I don't have any faith in the public school system because I do. My daughter will continue in Ps. She is an honor student. So she has adjusted very smoothly to the system.

Anonymous
05-04-2004, 10:16 AM
Jennifer, the public schools are graduating kids that are incapable of doing math my 10YO daughter is currently doing. Most HS kids have high expectations placed on them. PS no longer does that. The goal for them is to graduate as many as possible, regardless of what the kids are doing. My DH was told by his administrator a while back that he should be given a passing grade to ANY kid that took the time to show up to class, regardless of the quality of work turned in. Our kids EXCEED those government standards; we see to it! Let them base college admission on test scores, rather than a worthless piece of paper. If a high school drop out wants to go to college without a diploma, why not...as long as they can pass the entrance exam. Here in the U.S., most college freshmen are stuck in remedial classes just to be able to take their basic classes.

TinaTx
05-04-2004, 10:55 AM
Jennifer, our *proof is in our pudding*. The reason hsers do excel is because of 1:1 tutoring. Wouldn't any teacher want the *ideal* school? You know low rate of student to teacher. Well we do and we have it:) Homeschooling is very intensive because of low to no interruptions with the student.They are taught to think in longer intervals. In ps, as good as the teacher is, she is subject to interruptions and rules.

The curriculums that we have to choose from, which are many, have *grading services* if you so choose. Calvert, who has been the longest homeschooling school around has teachers that our children turn their work into. Some states require accreditation.Calvert has been around for 100 years and runs a very elite day school in Maryland. Its often referred to as a *mini harvard*.True to their spirit though they recognize the best teacher is the parent. The one who knows EXACTLY how their child learns, and knows when to expect more from the child.

I always say that I will put my child up against any ps child anytime;) Why? Because my children's test scores speak volumes.My standards for my children are higher than any that a gov't institution can impose on me.Their standards are subject to fallacy. Look at the *No child left behind act* here in the US. Its the most sweeping reform since who knows when? I think the 60's. What happens all to the kids that came during that time. They had to reform because what they were doing before didn't work. I don't want my child a product of *ok this didn't work, lets try this*. I don't want a product of *testing and chance*. This is reform for the masses. I don't have the masses. I'm just interested in 3.

I agree, why have public schools? Well ps were invented for a variety of reasons. One is that the *working folks* could no longer do it themselves. Yes, I agree some children were not getting the education they needed. Others did not have the means ($$$) to afford such education. However, there were many who received the finest education that money could buy. Many of our country's leaders were schooled at home.Their parents made sure they received the education they needed.

Since a lot of ps children do struggle to get into college that falls squarely on the shoulders of the parents,not the teahers! Shame on them again! A parent is the *coach* for the long *marathon* (education) ahead of them. They can lose touch with it if they do not have an active part guiding it.Just as a coach drills, exercises and lays out the format, so does the parent. Everything that I have at my disposal,i.e. prepared curriculum, grading services, tutors, testing services, teaching videos, workshops for home educators, co-ops with other homeschoolers and field trips is a means to help me accomplish my coaching in a way that is best for my child.

What do you think?:D I enjoy this thread!

Blessings
TinaTx

bemax3
05-04-2004, 11:01 AM
Hi again Jennifer,

At this point in BC if a young adult is under the age of 19 they most likely will have to take and pass provincial exams in order to gain entrance to University...however, that may change! Any person, homeschooled or not..can register as a mature student at age 19 or above. Your mother, your aunt, your uncle or your father. Also, it is not uncommon to see teens in the 14-17 range attending community colleges and using those classes not only as transfer credits but proof that they do in fact have the necessary skills for furthering their education.

Being that you too are in BC you might like to do some further research. I believe it is Surrey that has one of the Homelearners Link type programs that had been established for almost 10 years now. One similar is opening in a Victoria, my city, in Sept.2004. The classroom space will be in a local elementary school. Also, June 10-12 is the BC Homelearners Convention, held in Surrey and if you would like to check that out you can meandor through the exhibition halls for a cost of $5 per day. It may give you an idea of the types of resources some homelearners use. There is a long list of speakers that day but that requires pre-registration and a fee for the entire day. If any of that interests you then let me know and I will email you the info.

Homelearning in BC is so popular. I don't what grades you teach but it is not uncommon for middle school classes in my city to have homelearning students in attendance for one or two classes each day.

As for the fairness issue on University entrance for public vs. homeschooled students...the homeschooled students still have to go through the entry process. They do have to prove themselves in their interviews and most have some form of a portfolio to take with them to show their interests over the years. In my experience, at least with my children, they do more each day than if they were in a classroom. I make my comparison as an aunt to 30+ nieces and nephews. They have free reign of their day and the quantity and quality of what they do is outstanding. Time is on their side when they are at home. Regardless of that I have many nieces and nephews that absolutely love their school environment. Most have similar learning styles, leaning towards the auditory/sequential path so they do fine with how the curriculum is delivered. I have teachers as family members and friends. For us, this is not a strike against schools but rather a choice for my kids to follow their natural learning style and their strong desire to be self guided learners.

I hope you find, with interest, more information on homeschooling.

Michelle

becky
05-04-2004, 01:12 PM
I plan to h.s. my daughter based on the treatment her older brother got duringhis years in p.s. He had ADHD, so right away he was labeled for his behavior. There were other labels given by peers and parents that have stuck to this day, never mind he's a completely different person. It's now May 4th, and I've been waiting to hear from his case manager what his graduating status is, based on grades and some other factors. This man has not enough time to manage these special ed. cases, but he's got time to manage sports teams. My son has had teachers who were blunt about not liking him and not wanting him in their class. I won't even waste space writing about the treatment he's gotten from peers over the years.

No, I don't want my daughter exposed to that garbage.

Anonymous
05-05-2004, 02:44 AM
Wow, you guys sure feel strongly about this! Part of me wishes I had never thought to ask the questions! Only because now I'm starting to wonder whether I should HS my son! He's doing really well in school, 1st grade, but the class is full of monkeys and when I volunteer there I see him doing a whole lot of nothing and not being accountable for it. Don't get me wrong, he's got a wonderful teacher, too nice in my opinion, needs a little more strictness, but, she's loaded down with all these behaviour problem children. I feel like I have to work with him every day after school to get him to do some work because I know he spent the whole day chatting! Now, if he were in the grade 1 class at my school I know he'd be working and not slacking off! It's frustrating. I have to admit that as a PS teacher I've been brainwashed into thinking that HSers are a little flaky...you know all the cliches...I was always very opposed to it...I can't say that anymore, but it's sure got me thinking. I'm torn between loving the idea and sticking up for us public schools!
Does anyone have any regrets?.....:confused:

bemax3
05-05-2004, 03:18 AM
I think the key here is that the general public has choice. Homeschooling is yet another choice for education for families. It doesn't have to be chosen as a last ditch effort after trying structured education. I know families where children have never stepped foot in a school. I feel no need to stick up for homeschooling as a choice so I find it hard to imagine why anyone would feel the need to stick up for public schools but I am not really into knocking down others choices. There are some excellent public schools in my city and even one public elementary school that does not assign grades and is parent participation. Parents often set high demands and many times with very little participation in their children's education. Lots of good teachers out there bound by curricula/testing demands.

That being said...as I have mentioned I can't imagine being in a better Province in Canada for educational choices. The variety is fantastic. So...any regrets you ask? Not yet! I love the fact that not only do we have time to connect as a family but my children can take in four different extra-curricular type classes and still enjoy most evenings free. We are simply not rushed. I like participating in Science Fairs that are strictly child created. All levels are welcome....parental assistance must be absolutely minimal from start to finish. I like that my oldest son can spend three hours straight with a university Math student and be so engrossed and enthralled that he will barely move except to grab a drink a quick snack (in his left hand of course while he writes with his right). I love that my kids are excellent self guided learners because they have/had the time to develop that skill. I love that they LOVE to read without rewards of any kind other than the joy of the book itself. I love being able to take four months to exploit one passion as far as comprehension will allow. I love that my kids can practice piano for an entire morning if they are inspired to do so and that is not unusual around here. Very important to me is that my children can speed ahead or coast when appropriate to their developmental needs. I would never stand for having to offer enrichment at home after my children spend six-seven hours away from home each day.

I don't spend alot of time teaching each day. We read ALOT...ny kids pretty much lead the way through our day. Their last report card will prove once again that kids can learn through self guided learning and the absence of structured education, worksheets and drill. This works great for our family and it is just one of many, many ways to homeschool.

You might like to try it one day!

Michelle

Mom2ampm
05-05-2004, 07:39 AM
Wow, you guys sure feel strongly about this! Part of me wishes I had never thought to ask the questions! Only because now I'm starting to wonder whether I should HS my son! He's doing really well in school, 1st grade, but the class is full of monkeys and when I volunteer there I see him doing a whole lot of nothing and not being accountable for it. Don't get me wrong, he's got a wonderful teacher, too nice in my opinion, needs a little more strictness, but, she's loaded down with all these behaviour problem children. I feel like I have to work with him every day after school to get him to do some work because I know he spent the whole day chatting! Now, if he were in the grade 1 class at my school I know he'd be working and not slacking off! It's frustrating. I have to admit that as a PS teacher I've been brainwashed into thinking that HSers are a little flaky...you know all the cliches...I was always very opposed to it...I can't say that anymore, but it's sure got me thinking. I'm torn between loving the idea and sticking up for us public schools!
Does anyone have any regrets?.....:confused:


I taught kindergarten for six years before quitting to be a stay-at-home-mom. I loved teaching more than anything...until my dd came along. So, I quit. I don't regret it for one second but I missed the teaching. So, I played school at home with dd while she was little. She learned so much. But, I, of course, wanted the best education out there for her. At the time, I assumed it was a private school near us. I enrolled her for prek4 and she did great. I still had some feelings of "she should be learning more" but they were already supposed to be a grade above. After two years at that school we decided the tuition was too much for two children. I have a son that would go this Fall. We decided to hs. I was at first reluctant. I just wanted to make the best decision for my kids. So, I prayed about it. I got my answer and now I homeschool. This is our first year and I loved it.

I can't say I agree with you in the quote above about the cliche of hs and how they are flaky. I never thought that. I thought it was a great thing to hs as long as the parent was serious and the child did well. I think a professor in college really made me see the wonderful side of hs. She hs her kids and taught class at a big university. I learned so much from her. So, I have never thought down of people who hs their kids. As a teacher, I can't think of a more ideal situation for teaching than homeschool. Since you were opposed to it, can you explain why? Don't you feel competent enough to hs your own children? I think the only feelings I had was will she miss seeing a group of kids all during the week? So, I enrolled her into other things so she would have more "kid play time". That has worked out great. So, really, I have no down side to give you for homeschooling, but don't get me started on the down side of public schooling, LOL.
;)

Angel
05-05-2004, 08:41 AM
Let's be honest here. Homeschoolers are actually doing our public schools a favor! Our ps are in trouble financially. They are taking all kinds of cuts. Teacher child ratio's are not what they should be. This is the biggest reason our ps teachers struggle to this day! They just have to many children to contend with. I don't envy them! I don't blame them! I do sympathize with them! As I said before I have a dd in our ps here. She has a teacher that I feel is so stressed out, she is frustrated with questions from her students. This is not how it should be!!! I hope you don't take any of this negatively. It is not my intention to bash anyone! I just thought that this point should be touched on!

Anonymous
05-05-2004, 08:47 AM
Hi Jennifer,
Absolutely no regrets here! We've been doing this for 2 years now. dd never wants to go back to ps. Way too noisy for her, and too many people. We don't have that problem at home--she always has one on one help as she is the only student in our school.

Good luck in your decision!
Kim R

vipdeal
05-05-2004, 12:47 PM
We have no regrets here!! My 2 girls have never been in public/private school. We love learning and playing and working (learning to keep a home; cleaning, cooking, yardwork) together. We have time to learn with reading and educational videos from the library but then also have time to bake cookies. We have free time when Dad gets home to read together or take walks and not have the pressure after supper of "did you get your homework done for school tomorrow".

Learning at home really lends itself to learning real life. When my Mom had a stroke last year, instead of having to take my kids to school, they came with me to the hospital. They learned what it takes to talk to the doctors, sign paperwork and what a stroke does to someone. They were there to provide companionship and love to their grandmother when she really needed them. I can't tell you how much it meant to her to have them there. I didn't have to worry about them missing school, this was learning about real life.

This spring for the first time we have a pair of bluebirds nesting in a box about 8 feet from our kitchen window. My girls are watching them diligently building their nest, feeding them mealworms and hopefully will be able to see their babies when the time is right. We can spend an hour just watching them if we want to. It has been a wonderful learning experience of what God has provided through nature.

We have been blessed and the girls grow up so fast that they will be 18 and out the door so quickly.

We are taking the time now to enjoy each other and really get to know one another. (No peer pressure to deal with here.)

I am not saying homeschooling is easy, but the learning possibilities at home, field trips, homeschool co-ops, all the rescources for homeschoolers, etc. are endless and so rewarding.

Thanks for letting me share with you some of our experiences.

Michelle S.















:)

Kathe
05-05-2004, 03:05 PM
Wow, you guys sure feel strongly about this! Part of me wishes I had never thought to ask the questions! Only because now I'm starting to wonder whether I should HS my son! He's doing really well in school, 1st grade, but the class is full of monkeys and when I volunteer there I see him doing a whole lot of nothing and not being accountable for it. Don't get me wrong, he's got a wonderful teacher, too nice in my opinion, needs a little more strictness, but, she's loaded down with all these behaviour problem children. I feel like I have to work with him every day after school to get him to do some work because I know he spent the whole day chatting! Now, if he were in the grade 1 class at my school I know he'd be working and not slacking off! It's frustrating. I have to admit that as a PS teacher I've been brainwashed into thinking that HSers are a little flaky...you know all the cliches...I was always very opposed to it...I can't say that anymore, but it's sure got me thinking. I'm torn between loving the idea and sticking up for us public schools!
Does anyone have any regrets?.....:confused:

I'm in New Brunswick, like Brenda. My kids have never been to public school and in NB there aren't any of the programs like they have in BC and other provinces. Literally, we are offered NOTHING. The school board urges us to acquire the Province's curriculum documents, which I stupidly did for a number of years. Then I realized ... if I really wanted to follow all this *crap*, I'd just send my kids to school and let someone else teach it to them. Then I came to the realization that the bulk of what is in those documents never gets covered anyway.

Your post, quoted above, echoes some of the sentiments I express when people want to stick up for PS. I simply ask them ... "why would you want your child away from the family home for 8 hours a day, only to have to come home and spend 1-3 hours of what should be family time, covering what the teacher couldn't because she is spread too thin?"

Personally, the very notion drove me nuts. I saw my girlfriend send her first little one to public school, and complain about all his homework and how long it took and how it interfered with their evenings and family time. No way should school take over a child's life ... nevermind the whole family !!! You mentioned that you have to spend time with him at night. I won't even mention that at least in this Province, teachers are sending kids home with homework, that their ILLITERATE parents are supposed to be able to help them complete. It creates an endless spiral. Those kids can't get help at school because there are no resources, and the parents are sadly inept due to whatever lack existed in their public school past. How is the cycle broken? I don't know, but homeschooling seems an easier solution to me than watching the struggles my friends go through with their kids. I'm not doing homework with my kids at 9 pm ... but they are. I have NO homeschooling friends and I don't have a clue what's taking them so long to get on board LOL.

I may likely be the type of homeschooling parent a PS teacher would say is too slack. With five kids here and four grades to teach, it's tough enough to cover the basics ... I don't have time to include art, music, etc. Of course, in our district those things are not being taught either. As I mentioned, there are no school board supported programs we can join to supplement as there are in other locations. Am I slack? I don't think so. I certainly have no regrets, to answer your last question. This is especially so during moments like when my son was explaining to my 40+ year old friend who took two years of nursing, how to do grade 8/9 math, when he's only in grade 7.

As was mentioned by another poster, homeschooling allows us to pursue a child's strong points, even to higher grade levels than their other subjects. It's like sprinkling seed and water where the soil is best. For my oldest son, that's in Math. Can he write a really great composition? Nope. Does it worry me? Nope. The other night, out of the blue, he started writing these little rap songs about family stuff, like his sister's broken leg. His rhymes were really clever and I had to chuckle at them. I know he's got it in him ... he just needs inspiration. That's probably my fault. I need to inspire him with interesting writing assignments. We still have five years of schooling to work on that. Besides ... at the rate he's going in math (skipping grade 8 and moving to Algebra 1) we can take all of grade 12 and work on writing if we want to. That's the beauty of homeschooling ... a little seed here, a little water there. Sometimes even old roots need to be dug up .. that's ds's writing issues LOL.

I've gone on and on (TinaTx is a bad influence LOL), but hopefully made a point. Clearly, you KNOW what's best for your child. Your post shows it. Don't allow the slack environment he is in to send him the wrong message about learning. Just some thoughts.

Kathe

Deena
05-05-2004, 05:14 PM
Jennifer,

As I said in another post, I wouldn't tell you you HAVE to or SHOULD homeschool, though I believe in it with all my heart, but I know you CAN homeschool! I also believe it would make a world of difference for your son! He's a bright child, and, if homeschooling is done correctly, he could really go places he wouldn't be allowed or able to otherwise! YOU will be the one to guide him and see his eyes light up when he understnds something, YOU will be the one that gets to spend time with him each day helping him learn and building a stronger family relationship. I don't think you'd regret homeschooling, and I can pretty much guarantee that when he's older he will thank you for the time you had together, for the sacrifices you made for him, and for being a great mom! Right now the kids don't always think you're so great, or appreciate your sacrifices, but it's been so worth it to me to spend this precious time with my 3 children--I LOVE it (well, most of the time :eek: )! :D

Keep thinking about it, it's great!:cool:

TinaTx
05-05-2004, 05:15 PM
Jennifer, I don't feel that I should defend a homeschooler who doesn't educate her child! IMHO, the parents will have a day of reckoning :eek: I'm not the judge.I can't change the ps system, and I don't want to. I'm just one. What I can do is to inform those who are uniformed.:)

Ps would have a parent think that teaching a child to read is a *secret process*. A process that can only be admininstered by a person that has a degree. Its not a secret process, it is quite easy. Ps wants us to think that character training comes from *Just say no to drugs* or *safe----* Oops, I'm not sure if I can say that here;) Whatever happened to abstinence, virtue, chastity and honesty?I want to be able to teach these things to my children, not another 7 yo.

My son did go one year to ps in Kindergarten. He too had a nice teacher! He was in the accelerated class and EVERYDAY there were constant interruptions from kids of parents who thought the education institution was a babysitting service!:rolleyes: I didn't want that to rub off on my son. It WASN'T the teacher, it was the permissive attitude of the parents. The teacher was not recognized as the profession that she is in the GOOD school that he went to.

I went 3 days a week to the public school.I told the teacher in the beginning *I realize you don't know me from Adam, BUT this child is MY child.I'm responsible for his education. Quite frankly how can I help if I don't know whats going on.* So I went on to explain to her that I would be up at the school 3 days a week helping in her class and with the HOSTS (helping other students to succeed...in reading)I did this all year.

I was shocked how at every parent night, for the 18 kids she had in the class, there were no more than 5 sets of parents that came . WHATS UP??:eek: HELLOOOO!!:D Where were they at? What was so important that they couldn't take 20 or 30 minutes to come talk to the teacher and see their child's work product?;)

You don't have to be *torn*:D just do what is best for YOUR child as a MOM. The title of mom, parent and caregiver is the most sacred title of any degree I hold or ever could hold. It is a God given assignment that I hold precious and dear.

I hope I don't put you to sleep:D :D reading this!

Brenda
05-05-2004, 08:43 PM
Jennifer,
You asked if any of us had any regrets - the ONLY regret I have is that I didn't home school sooner than we did - if I would have followed the direction I was being led in when I was first convicted to home school, I could have saved my family a lot of pain.

We've only been home schooling for 6 weeks and we've had some hurdles to over come (the misperception that I need to have a teaching degree in order to teach my son - I disagree with that - no offense meant to you). Andrew was in public school for K-3 (half of 3 anyway) and we've had a hard time 'de-programming' him.

Last week we had a really rough time when he told two different people that I was too hard on him - that I gave him more work to do than his teachers did - boy did I feel rotten. I was actually re-evaluating what I was doing and whether I should continue. We went so far as to go to the school yesterday to see what they could (or would) do about putting him back in - we left there with a horrible taste in our mouths. His teacher told us that her class has been great since Andrew left - they blamed him for all the trouble in the class (he's not perfect by any means, but I do know that he wasn't always the cause of the trouble - I was told that by other teachers in the school who witnessed Andrew being provoked - the problem we had was only half the problem was being dealt with - and it was always Andrew who got the brunt of it). When Andrew was provoked, he was sent to the office for his share of the problem while the other child got the 'slap on the fingers' treatment - "Now, Now (insert name) you shouldn't do that" and they were sent off on their merry way! :rolleyes:

I'm not a great advocate for the public school system because of the battles we've been through this year. The system isn't set up for 'special needs' (Andrew is ADHD, ODD, has hearing deficits and visual deficits).

If you feel you want to home school, sit down with your spouse (or partner) AND your child and write out the pro's and con's of both then it gives you soemthing to look back on. My own opinion is DON'T do it if you don't have full support from your spouse - it will make it harder on you.

As for home schoolers being flaky - if I can teach my children to walk and talk and ride a bike (for example), teaching them their school work is a piece of cake (again that's my opinion). While I don't have a degree in education I do have a post secondary education (in nursing) and have done multiple courses since graduating from that program - many of which were self taught. I had a family when I took these courses and I worked full time when I did them - I still had top honour marks - so basic material is not a problem for me.

I've rambled on enough, Sorry.
:o
Brenda

Anonymous
05-05-2004, 09:14 PM
Well, I DO have a degree in Education, plus PLENTY of graduate courses. And, while it might help in some ways, it's a hinderance in others. We've talked about "deprogramming" kids when we pull them from PS. But there's also a "deprogramming" for those of us that are "trained" educators! Sometimes it's very hard for us to "think out of the school box", so to speak! If I didn't have all that "education", maybe I'd be more willing just to relax and do it, and not freak out that my daughter won't finish her math book this year!

Anonymous
05-10-2004, 02:03 AM
I taught kindergarten for six years before quitting to be a stay-at-home-mom. I loved teaching more than anything...until my dd came along. So, I quit. I don't regret it for one second but I missed the teaching. So, I played school at home with dd while she was little. She learned so much. But, I, of course, wanted the best education out there for her. At the time, I assumed it was a private school near us. I enrolled her for prek4 and she did great. I still had some feelings of "she should be learning more" but they were already supposed to be a grade above. After two years at that school we decided the tuition was too much for two children. I have a son that would go this Fall. We decided to hs. I was at first reluctant. I just wanted to make the best decision for my kids. So, I prayed about it. I got my answer and now I homeschool. This is our first year and I loved it.

I can't say I agree with you in the quote above about the cliche of hs and how they are flaky. I never thought that. I thought it was a great thing to hs as long as the parent was serious and the child did well. I think a professor in college really made me see the wonderful side of hs. She hs her kids and taught class at a big university. I learned so much from her. So, I have never thought down of people who hs their kids. As a teacher, I can't think of a more ideal situation for teaching than homeschool. Since you were opposed to it, can you explain why? Don't you feel competent enough to hs your own children? I think the only feelings I had was will she miss seeing a group of kids all during the week? So, I enrolled her into other things so she would have more "kid play time". That has worked out great. So, really, I have no down side to give you for homeschooling, but don't get me started on the down side of public schooling, LOL.
;)
Don't you feel competent enough to hs your own children?
Well, Mom2ampm, I'm pretty sure I could handle it...I've been teaching for over 13 years...and a variety of grades and curriculum too. That certainly isn't the issue.

heatherwasp
05-10-2004, 09:55 AM
Amen Jackie, I'm with ya on that!!!! :D:D:D:D

Anonymous
05-12-2004, 01:14 AM
Here's something else I've been thinking of: how do you get one child to focus on work while your 3 year old runs around like a crazy person? My oldest can't even eat dinner without the little one distracting him.:eek:
Jennifer

Anonymous
05-12-2004, 06:51 AM
The same way you try to get 6 kids taking part in a reading group, two on the computer, another group in the corner practicing math drills, three in a different corner playing a game because their work is done, speech therapists and reading specialists popping in and out, kids arriving late, and that's not even taking into account the two Special Needs children that can't sit still for more than two minutes AND the other three that SHOULD be labeled special needs, but their parents won't let anyone test.......

Distractions are a part of life. You learn to live with it and teach your child to cope with them. I have one daughter that will go upstairs to her room and work if it gets too hectic, my preschooler needs to put earphones on while on the computer (same as you do in your classroom, I would guess!), he might be in the basement playing, or sometimes he takes part in what we're doing. I can give him a history picture to color while the girls and I do our history work, and if there's something to cut out, he'll have a fit if he can't have one, too.

And yes, there are days when he's running wild around the house and I'm tearing my hair out (he's four, after all!)

TinaTx
05-12-2004, 01:32 PM
Jennifer, after all we are just people! Not superhumans;) I think a another difference is that they are YOUR kids, subject to your rules of discipline, not someone elses!

All morning today, my ds that just turned 4, had on obsession with the umbrella. He popped it open and shut the whole morning! Not too bad, EXCEPT for the fact he was popping it open/shut in my other two boys faces while they were reading:eek:

Not all days are like this! Thank Goodness! We have many times when my older sons hold the *baby*(baby huey!! :eek: )in their lap while they read! Priceless!

In addition, we can stop early or keep working depending on what *mood* they are in! We have many days, when everyone, including mom just doesn't feel good. I have to say though we probably have many more days where we don't want to stop....we just want to keep on going! Somehow we manage what we are SUPPOSE to get in for the year, PLUS more that I hadn't counted on.

Brooke
05-12-2004, 01:42 PM
Or.....you can see to your kids' needs when they have them....for learning, eating, bathing, learning, playing, comforting, correcting, learning, playing, pondering, praising, learning.......

Learning in our home isn't "school at home", so I don't ever feel that one child is distracting our teachable moments.....now if they both need my attention at the same time, one is learning patience while they wait! :cool:

Now where was the problem you were asking about???? :confused: :D :D :D

Anonymous
05-12-2004, 03:48 PM
Brooke, we did a lesson once about "putting on patience". I'll be busy, and Phillip will be bugging me AGAIN about wanting a drink RIGHT NOW, and I'll ask him, "Mommy said she would in a little bit. What do you need to put on right now?" And I'll get an exasperated, "PATIENCE!!!" Then, every once in a while when he's waiting as long as he can, he'll come up and tell me, "Mommy, I'm being VERY, VERY patient!!!"

She
05-12-2004, 09:37 PM
Jackie,
Your remark about the kid wanting a drink got me to thinking....scary eh? ;)

Am I the only one who fills up a water cup for each child for the day and then let them drink when they want? I've had several people tell me they have/had to stop what they were doing to get the kid a drink. I Hummmm Am I weird? Ok really don't answer that. :p Of course if they need a refill they get it but...I walk by the cups all the time and when I see they are half full I will fill it back up in my spare moment.

Anyway...around here you only get *flavored* drink at meals or if we make special milkshakes. All other times it's water kiddo!

Anonymous
05-12-2004, 10:50 PM
Actually, She, I got smart a while back when we had a REALLY HOT summer. I bought my girls water bottles, and would keep them filled in the refridge. It REALLY helped, and had them drinking more water rather than other things (juice, Kool Aid, etc.). Problem is, they can't seem to fill them by themselves. I guess the water just tastes better when Mom fills them up, LOL! Phillip's funny, though. He'll ask for juice ("because I'm WEALLY THIRSTY!!!"). I'll tell him that I'll get him some water. Well, he suddenly decides he's not THAT thirsty!

Deena
05-14-2004, 01:06 AM
She,

I did that too. But when we moved 2 years ago, the fridge came with the house---yay! It has the water thing in the fridge door, so my youngest (she had JUST turned 5) could get at it. She was so proud of herself being able to get her own drink! We also don't have juice much, except orange juice for breakfast. Soda is a rare treat also. Now my youngest is 7, my middle one is 10, and Guess what? I am getting a teenager next week! What do I do with it??!! It's my first one!:eek: Yes, my oldest is turning 13! Anyway, I digress.... some days you just can't keep up with all the demands the kids seem to have. Other days it seems like you get sooo much done! With homeschooling it's okay, cuz they get so much one-on-one attention! Today we had a blast---it was a beautiful day, which right away boded ill for schoolwork. So we did music practice and math, then spent the rest of the day hiking, and throwing rocks in a pond, and laughing, and enjoying the beautiful weather and fresh air (yes, we have that here in Washington state)! :cool: It was still a great learning experience! There were many things we talked about and discussed. But it was while we were having fun, so they didn't know they were learning! It was one of those really nice days that I wish we could have more often. They were excited about it too!

So what subject were we talking about? I'm all over the place in my comments here!

Anonymous
05-14-2004, 07:55 AM
Oh, I WANT ONE of those refriges! My MIL has one with crushed ice, and I told DH just the other day it was our next BIG purchase (yeah, right!!!) As for Birthdays, Faythe is 8 today!

Kathe
05-14-2004, 08:14 AM
I'm getting one of those too ... a teenager, not a fancy fridge LOL !!! :p

My oldest ds will be 13 in just over a week. YIKES !!! :eek:

As for the fridge, I got an all-fridge 18 months ago ... don't know how I lived without one.

Kathe

Deena
05-14-2004, 05:02 PM
Jackie,

It's well worth it to get a fridge like that! Ours has the water and ice cubes or crushed ice. When we have people over, the kids can get their ice and drinks themselves, and that's great! I don't know what I did without it either! Course, ours was rather expensive, we bought a house to get it! :eek: :)

Kathe,

WOW, our children are close in age! My oldest ds will be 13 on Thursday (the 20th). He thinks he's pretty cool:cool: , but then, so do I (most of the time)! ;) , but I'm still interested to see how life goes with a teenager!:p It could be quite interesting! :rolleyes: But I am thankful for him, and for my other two, and especially my husband!:D

Now I'm like TinaTx, using all the smilies:p

Talk with you later...

She
05-14-2004, 05:21 PM
Deena's getting smile happy!!! :D

Around here we have a 5yo and 18mos - both boys. so.....I have to give them drinks otherwise my 18 month old "Taz" would find a way to scale the cabinet get a cup, open the refrig and do it himself. Ok...maybe not yet but....let me tell ya...that kid. UGH!!!!!

We had a great day today... Taz took a LOOOONG nap - 2hr 30min :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D Very nice!!!!

We school while he naps. It was an easy school day because ds had already done most of his reading assignment yesterday because he "really wanted to read a story from his book". Gotta love that! Anyway...we got to do some extra easy & fun goofy things.

He is really curious about cursive and likes to write on the white board. Of course he thinks if the letters are connected it's cursive. :)

We finally have sun!!!! Yesterday we got hit really hard with severe storms and LOT'S of rain. We didn't have any damage but, about 2 miles away they had quite a bit. They think a tornado touched down. It was a scary day!

Enjoy the teenages! I've got a while before we have to *prepare* for that. Mostly just keeping the refrig stocked constantly right, Deena? :D

Deena
05-15-2004, 07:21 PM
She,

Yes, definitely keep the fridge stocked--but only with waffles, burritos and pizza! Vegetable are tolerated, but certainly not asked for!

The attitude is the other thing. Sometimes I have to work at not taking it personally. He's really not terrible, but he's definitely changed in the last year, and my husband and I are pretty stupid somtimes!:rolleyes: He really does have a lot of good attributes, so I keep praying that he leans in that direction, rather than toward his negative attitudes!!! I know God will give me strength and patience to get through this time, but I WANT IT NOW!!!:p I'm hoping for the best for all three of my kids. It's interesting to have reached a new plateau--that of the teenage years. I WANT to enjoy them, so I hope I do! :D

She
05-15-2004, 09:12 PM
Geez! My 5 year old has attitude. He doesn't get far with it but, he's got it. :D

Deena, good luck keeping the frig stocked!

Anonymous
05-15-2004, 09:30 PM
Deena, I've been told that there is a definate change at about that age. It has to do with them becoming "a man". What I'm being told is that the father needs to take over more of the discipline or authority than in the past; that the young person needs to recognize the mother's authority is an extension of the father's; and it has something to do with his need to pull away from his mother. It's been a "hot topic" at my Lady's Group, as most of them have boys that age. I told DH that this probably explained part of the trouble I had as a step-mom. My DSSs were at that age when we were married, and I was in the position where I needed to establish my authority when the while they needed to pull away.

Brooke
05-15-2004, 11:05 PM
Ever read "Bringing Up Boys" by Dobson? If I am not mistaken, he claims that switch needs to take place much earlier--maybe around 5 or 6???? Can't remember.....hmmmm.....

Deena
05-16-2004, 12:02 AM
She, Actually my boys take after me---they love food! They've eaten a LOT since they were little, and I've been worried that when they get to the teenage years we'll have to mortgage the house to pay for their food!!! So, now the time is coming---hope we can keep our house! :D

Jackie, I've heard that also. It seems to be quite true, and I'm working on myself to not be over-protective at this stage in his life, yet let him know I love him and will be there for him no matter what!:rolleyes:

Anonymous
05-16-2004, 04:42 AM
Gee Deena I'm in Washington state too. Don't you love our weather lately??
I think we got a little off topic. I just can't imagine being able to get any work done with my 7 year old whan my 3 year old is around.
What does a daily schedule look like? Let's say for a 2nd grader, for example? Just give me an idea.
Jennifer

bemax3
05-16-2004, 11:00 AM
Hey Jennifer,

I have a boy that is third grade age and our day runs smoothly. His siblings are ages four and five. We don't do "school at home" so we don't have a set schedule as far as certain times to do certain things. We make a list at the beginning of each day of "must do's" and my oldest son, with a little input from me and his siblings, pretty much plans his own time. If he wakes up raring to go he may spend two or three hours working on a project or practicing piano. If he is a bit groggy, or we all are, we may head out for a run first thing instead of just our usual morning walk. Really though, so much gets accomplished here and the kids are great at keeping up with their responsibilities without me setting the pace.

Michelle

Brenda
05-16-2004, 01:35 PM
Gee Deena I'm in Washington state too. Don't you love our weather lately??
I think we got a little off topic. I just can't imagine being able to get any work done with my 7 year old whan my 3 year old is around.
What does a daily schedule look like? Let's say for a 2nd grader, for example? Just give me an idea.
Jennifer

Jennifer,
We have a 'plan' of things we'd like to accomplish for the day - if we get it all done great - if not it's not a big deal.

We let Andrew set the pace - if he's rearing to go and work on his math (which he could care a less if he ever had to do) then that's what we do. Somedays he won't touch his math - other days you can't get anything else done because he's so geared for math. Somedays instead of working in books, we take trips to town and go grocery shopping, etc. where he helps us figure out if 1 can of soup is 0.49 and we want 5 cans how much will it cost etc. He learns from the hands on things and (so far) this is what we've come up with . He's learning his math (and other things) from an everyday life perspective.

In order to get him to learn about the community we live in (as part of the social studies 'curriculum guideline'), he wrote a penpal letter and "taught" the other child about the area in which we live. He likes the idea of being the "teacher" and so we guided him to learn by teaching someone else. (We told him the other child thinks that in Canada we live in Igloos - that got his thinking cap on and moving in the right direction.)

We've learned that no two days are alike so we take each day as it comes and he sets the pace for learning. Home schooling offers flexibilty that I didn't see in the public school system and it works for us.

Brenda

vipdeal
05-16-2004, 02:35 PM
Jennifer,

We have a 6 and 8 year old. We keep the lessons short. Ususally 15 minutes to 1/2 hour increments. Then they take a break and play or eat lunch or go outside. Then we come together again for another short session, etc.

While your 3 year old is working on a puzzle or doing a preschool type workbook or coloring page, then your 2nd grader can work on his level workbooks, textbooks, computer or whatever you choose to use. We also use the whiteboard alot to practice math and spelling. Check out http://www.saxonpublishers.com/ and click on Online Activities. They have wonderful math and phonics exercises starting at the Kindergarten level on up. (you don't need to use their curriculum for access, we don't). Your 2nd grader could do these while you play/teach your 3 year old. Your 3 year old may start to like some of the reading sites like starfall.com (great pictures and stories for beginning sounds and reading).

We read alot of library books covering all different subjects that I read to both children at the same time or while your 3 year old is doing a puzzle or playing with legos. The older child can even start to teach the younger one to read. It is fun to watch.

Remember you don't have to do 6 hours of sit down work a day. You can get most learning done in 1-2 hours (includes reading time, learning games, nature walks, etc.) for what they may have learned in a classroom setting with 30 kids all day.

I hope some of these suggestions help you. Some days we get more done than others, but I don't worry about it. We have 365 days a year to learn together so alot is accomplished overall.

Michelle S.

Anonymous
05-16-2004, 02:59 PM
I would also keep dittos available for my little one. That way, when the others were working, if he decided that he wanted to "do school", too, I'd have papers ready to give him. If he just colors on them, that's fine. Sometimes I'll have an extra coloring page about what we were discussing (such as a state map when we were doing geography) that he can color on. He also is very independent when it comes to the computer. Someone once suggested (TinaTx, maybe?) of having activities in plastic bags he can do ONLY during "school time". Magnetic letters, sorting...that kind of thing. Last of all, does he take a nap? If so, be sure to use his nap time (while you still can, lol!)

Brooke
05-16-2004, 05:58 PM
Gee Deena I'm in Washington state too. Don't you love our weather lately??
I think we got a little off topic. I just can't imagine being able to get any work done with my 7 year old whan my 3 year old is around.
What does a daily schedule look like? Let's say for a 2nd grader, for example? Just give me an idea.
Jennifer

:confused: sc..sche...sched-oo-ul...:confused:

All joking aside, when this public school year is over and we no longer give our time charitably to that institution, I have no doubt that we will not be needing to have a rigorous schedule for academics. If I tried to enforce an academic schedule it would mean prying my kids away from what they are learning on their own. Both of my kids have been taught at home from infancy (aside from a ds attending some public school)and I've been told by "official" people that their knowledge is far beyond that of their peers (one more so than the other). I have no reason to doubt that pattern will continue as long as we maintain the same routine, or lack there of, in our home.

Don't get me wrong, we are involved with groups and orginizations that demand scheduling on our part, but the core of my children's knowledge has been obtained through conventional methods--ask a question, get an answer (even if the answer is "I don't know, let's find out") We have not yet encountered a need to schedule predetermined informational snippets into our daily routine. ;)

I was reading through your post about working with your 7yo when your 3yo is around. I was thinking of the concentration than must go into working individually with 20+ kids the same age in the room. To me, even given the common demands of a 3yo, I can't imagine the needs of 20 7yo's being somehow easier to address. Classic apple compared to a bushel of oranges. :eek:

Out of curiosity, what were you expecting to hear? I don't want to sound too presumptuous, but you seem to be trying to draw something out of us that we are not giving to you.

Deena
05-16-2004, 09:00 PM
Jennifer,

Every child is different, so it's hard to say what will for sure work, but these ladies have made some great suggestions. I used to be a teacher, and once I got over the bejeebers of being in charge of my child's academic education, I realized that it really is easier to teach your own, despite the distractions, than a whole classroom! Some days when I was teaching, I KNEW the kids were just not into it that day, but I still had to make it through the curriculum, or the parents and faculty would NOT be happy! Now if we need a break, we take it! My kids LOVE exploring outside, playing at parks, figuring out the plants and animals and spiders and bugs we see, making a pier with rocks in the pond nearby, etc., etc. That is all healthy learning, and they do learn! Once we get back to the sit-down schoolwork, they are more clear-headed, and accomplish a lot more than if I would have forced them to sit there and get it done no matter what. There are times that something just has to get done, and they have to do that, but mostly I can allow them time to clear their heads and they are therefore more receptive to the learning process. I'm not sure if I stated that clearly, but at any rate, they do learn much more quickly at home than in the school classroom because they get one-on-one attention by the person who loves them most in the world! My first year of hsing, I had a 6 year old, a 4 year old and a 1 year old. It's not always easy, but I did a lot of hands-on stuff, and, as someone said earlier, took advantage of the nap-times to work with my oldest. 2nd grade doesn't need huge amounts of sit-down time, so the hands-on stuff worked well for him, and my younger two. Letting them explore in the back yard, explain to and describe what they saw and did, playing kickball and catch, singing kids songs, etc. My 2nd grader got interested in Presidents, so we found a placemat with them on and looked at that, we got books out of the library and read about different Presidents, and read about and looked at pictures of the White hose, etc. There's lots that can be accomplished by running things with their interests. We end up covering all the "school" categories, yet it's done in an interesting, usually more exciting way.

Yikes:eek: I've gone on and on here. But it's definitely possible, and though not always easy, it's very rewarding for you as well as your child!

Deena
05-16-2004, 09:03 PM
Actually we didn't read about a white hose, we read about the White House! :p

TinaTx
05-16-2004, 11:04 PM
Jennifer.........

It is much easier teaching them together than separate for certain subjects like history, science, foreign languages, art and music! You can adjust up or down as necessary.

However, for the skill subjects such as math and some language arts, then each individual child's skill level needs to be worked on along with mom's tutoring.

So to keep my 3yo busy, I prepared a huge number of Ziploc bags. You know the one gallon and two gallon ones.I think I prepared close to 50 or more. Each bag was *complete* in the sense it had everything he needed to work on a particular skill. So I could take them with me when we had to travel or waited on one of the other boys for music lessons,etc.Also if he brought one to me, I didn't have to get up to put something with it..I just explained and he started working. Everything was precut, premeasured, prepped, and included.I only brought down so many at a time and put in his red drawer from the top bookshelf. He could hardly contain his excitement to look each day in his red drawer.

These are some of the ideas that I did... Each bag had a letter in it, uppercase and lower case together. He would trace those letters with pen,marker or crayon. The bag contained paper, letters, and/or stencils of that letter, stamp of letter. Also if i could make stick people of the alphabet letter, I would. It also contained small toys from the bottom of the toy box that began with that letter sound, if i had any. If I didn't find any, I tried to put some old coupons or letter from cereal boxes, soup labels peel off easily too. I put some pictures from an old card playing deck of animals and things that was not a whole deck anymore. I put a duplicate picture of our family in the bag for F for family. He was delighted with having his own photo!! Cheap plastic zoo animals, small bouncing balls out of gum ball machine, and plastic Jacks for J. I would also add a treat like jelly beans, gum or some other snack like peanuts that would keep a little longer.Just a little throughout not too much.

I also did numbers. I took index cards and put dots (bought them from walmart) on the cards to represent values. i also bought stickers and used different characters or animals to show the value of the number. One side would have the number, the other side the picture. Look for smaller stickers for the larger numbers. I also had some old cardboard and cut up HUGE numbers. Then I would put a whole bunch of stickers in his bag and he loved sticking them/collaging all over the number. I also used my scrapbooking paper punches for motor skills. Some mornings he would punch for 15 minutes or sooo.hee hee I loved it!

Some bags contained cut yarn complete with beads to string.
One bag had licorice for neclace and cheerios (some got crushed, some were still good) for stringing. I added another licorce stick or two for good measure.:D :p Somehow one always got eaten! LOL

Another one (actually several that I kind of spread out) had his name that I printed off in HUGE type and after I find a font that was good I put it in a laminated sheet. (can buy a box of laminated sheets from Walmart). It had a dry eraser marker in the bag with it.

Another had a shoebox lid only in it cut with holes. I had put a shoelace in the holes. He could hold it in his lap and get somewhat familar with tying shoes.

Some bags I made I wanted him to not open. So I glued and/or stapled because they were for *exploring and feeling purposes*. I used some blue hair gel and put plastic fish/sea animals in it. He could *squash and feel and see the ooze like a ocean*.. Ditto for birdseed. I used both an old litter bottle and plastic bottle. It was called *I spy*. he had to look for a button, safety pin, letter, a little men,etc.

I did shapes...He put stickers on them..I also made simple pictures like a house , ice cream cone, traffic signal and already cut out the shapes out of construction paper. It was like a puzzle. He had to glue the pieces on the picture..I made a seal and he glued a *ball* (a circle) on his nose..

Ok....Ok......I had many more ideas, but I think you get it:eek: :D

This took a month or so to do,BUT I used them for the whole year, plus I still have a few left:D :D

Someone told me we could even get together with other moms and have one mom make like 30 of the same theme bag..Then, come to the homeschooling group and *exchange* with other moms in the group and we all have one of each different skill/them.

I don't like using the Tv as a babysitter:rolleyes: he has two programs that he watches and the TV goes OFF. After that, he learns how to entertain himself.. The emphasis on *learn* (an ongoing project):D

So it is up to me to create the enviroment for him to learn and play in.

I don't have ANY problems entertaining my 3 yo who just turned 4! He did have a lot of fun this last year learning!:eek: :D I will continue making learning fun and playing this year! I am not at a loss for ideas or the *want to*!

I told dh I am a *one gal entertainment committee*!:rolleyes: :D

Tina

heatherwasp
05-17-2004, 08:12 AM
Fab ideas Tina!!!! I think I'm going to borrow those from you, thanks:D:D:D

Deena
05-18-2004, 12:07 AM
Tina,

PLUS, you are my homeschool hero---you have such great ideas!:D I still wish I could go just be around you and She for a month or so and just absorb all that you do into my brain so I could do it too! I've had some pretty good ideas, and great times with my kids, but the consistent great ideas that you are so good at tend to allude me!:( But as long as my kids don't know how great you are, they'll think we're doing just fine! ;)

Anonymous
05-18-2004, 12:33 AM
I was reading through your post about working with your 7yo when your 3yo is around. I was thinking of the concentration than must go into working individually with 20+ kids the same age in the room. To me, even given the common demands of a 3yo, I can't imagine the needs of 20 7yo's being somehow easier to address. Classic apple compared to a bushel of oranges. :eek:

Out of curiosity, what were you expecting to hear? I don't want to sound too presumptuous, but you seem to be trying to draw something out of us that we are not giving to you. [/B][/QUOTE]

Brooke, at this point I think a room full of 7 year olds would be easier than trying to deal with my 3 year old and get my 7 year old to do anything! :eek:

I am not trying to draw anything from you that you are not giving me- I am tossing around the idea of homeschooling and I wanted to do my Homework before I commit to anything, that's all.;)

Wow TinaTX you have some amazing ideas! I'm trying to figure out how to print/save your post so I can set up some of them too! Hope you don't mind.

Thank you to everyone who has answered my endless questions. I have not made up my mind yet. My hubby thinks I'm crazy, he's against it but he hasn't read your posts yet! I'll keep you posted...no pun intended....
Jennifer:)

heatherwasp
05-18-2004, 01:00 AM
Good luck Jennifer, I know my hubby thought I was nuts too. But he's come around more recently;)

Anonymous
05-18-2004, 06:54 AM
Jennifer, you might want to sit and talk with your DH. Figure out WHY he's against it, and carefully (unemotionally, lol!) discuss them. Do your homework. If it's socialization, give him a list of different ways you will have your children involved of "social activities", so he will see that you won't have them locked in the house 24/7. Does he think you couldn't handle it? Even though I had been in the classroom for ten years, that was my DH's fear. After the first year, when my 6YO started reading "Charlotte's Web", he backed WAY off on that one! HSLDA can give you some studies on the scores of HS'ers on ACT/SAT tests, and how (generally speaking) they score higher. Tell him it will just be "year to year", and he can reserve his judgement until after the first year is done.

I also believe that homeschooling should NOT happen if the DH is against it. (THis is JUST MY OPINION, so no one yell at me, please!!!) Now by that, I don't mean that he has to be gun-ho, 100% behind you. I mean that if he comes out and says "NO" you don't go ahead and do it anyway. Many men aren't too pleased, but are willing to let you try. And those guys usually come around eventually.

And we DON'T get upset with honest questions, it's just that many of us have had to deal with the few obnoxious teachers out there that think they know everything and that we're totally uncapable to do more than popping out children. So if we come across a little strong sometimes, please be patient with us, and keep asking your questions!

abcTammy
05-18-2004, 11:18 AM
FYI to anyone wanting to print off any of the wonderful ideas. There is an easy way to print only the parts you want. Drag and highlight with your mouse, then "right click" and press "copy", next open up word or whatever program you use and simply "paste" it in.
Tammy:rolleyes:

Brooke
05-18-2004, 02:45 PM
Brooke, at this point I think a room full of 7 year olds would be easier than trying to deal with my 3 year old and get my 7 year old to do anything! :eek:

I am not trying to draw anything from you that you are not giving me- I am tossing around the idea of homeschooling and I wanted to do my Homework before I commit to anything, that's all.;)

Wow TinaTX you have some amazing ideas! I'm trying to figure out how to print/save your post so I can set up some of them too! Hope you don't mind.

Thank you to everyone who has answered my endless questions. I have not made up my mind yet. My hubby thinks I'm crazy, he's against it but he hasn't read your posts yet! I'll keep you posted...no pun intended....
Jennifer:) [/B][/QUOTE]


Sorry, Jennifer, I'm afraid that I was getting the feeling that yet another professional teacher was trying to get an answer that would somehow confirm his/her notion that hs'ing is "just not right" :D

It's kinda hard to detect intentions with the limited number of smilies we have to work with.....;)

Brenda
05-18-2004, 04:02 PM
Jennifer, you might want to sit and talk with your DH. Figure out WHY he's against it, and carefully (unemotionally, lol!) discuss them. Do your homework. If it's socialization, give him a list of different ways you will have your children involved of "social activities", so he will see that you won't have them locked in the house 24/7. Does he think you couldn't handle it? Even though I had been in the classroom for ten years, that was my DH's fear. After the first year, when my 6YO started reading "Charlotte's Web", he backed WAY off on that one! HSLDA can give you some studies on the scores of HS'ers on ACT/SAT tests, and how (generally speaking) they score higher. Tell him it will just be "year to year", and he can reserve his judgement until after the first year is done.

I also believe that homeschooling should NOT happen if the DH is against it. (THis is JUST MY OPINION, so no one yell at me, please!!!) Now by that, I don't mean that he has to be gun-ho, 100% behind you. I mean that if he comes out and says "NO" you don't go ahead and do it anyway. Many men aren't too pleased, but are willing to let you try. And those guys usually come around eventually.

And we DON'T get upset with honest questions, it's just that many of us have had to deal with the few obnoxious teachers out there that think they know everything and that we're totally uncapable to do more than popping out children. So if we come across a little strong sometimes, please be patient with us, and keep asking your questions!

Jennifer, I have to agree with Jackie in that you need the support of your husband... Learning that from experience. He wasn't under the same conviction that I was to home school and that has caused some hurdles that we've had to overcome (and our son was able to very quickly pick up on it). We are now on the same page - but it took a lot of 'conversations' to get us there.

Again I think you need to sit down with your husband AND your child and on a piece of paper write down the pro's and con's of home schooling (with input from all of you). Any resistance may be as asimple as fear of losing 'together' time with your husband or something else like that.

I really enjoy home schooling - it's been a learning experience for all of us. Wish the decision was easier, but it's different for every family...

Brenda

bemax3
05-18-2004, 04:22 PM
I had no problem with my husband not agreeing with the choice to homeschool. Being that he works outside the home close to 80 hours a week I see it mainly as my choice. My choice was based on what worked best for our children first, next came for me, then for our household and family. As it turns out my husband is now thrilled with the choice in this being our third year. He spends much more time with the kids and revels in their thirst to learn. Just a personal choice but I would never put my children in an inappropriate educational environment just because my husband didn't want to jump on board with homeschooling.

Michelle

TinaTx
05-18-2004, 07:36 PM
Tina,

PLUS, you are my homeschool hero---you have such great ideas!:D I still wish I could go just be around you and She for a month or so and just absorb all that you do into my brain so I could do it too! I've had some pretty good ideas, and great times with my kids, but the consistent great ideas that you are so good at tend to allude me!:( But as long as my kids don't know how great you are, they'll think we're doing just fine! ;)


Deena.....

I'm a firm believer that each child has the RIGHT parent:D :D

You know when I was at the convention this weekend one of the workshops was a *what is your child's learning style?*. It was two parts. Before she started talking about children, she spent a lot of time on *What is YOUR teaching style?* She addressed the importance of teaching your children's learning style. However, she said that if you don't teach with YOUR style that you AND your children won't be happy!!!, ;) ;)

You know SHE'S RIGHT!!! Our personalities make the very people and teachers that we are! She used Cathy Duffeys terms: Perfect Paula, Social Sue, Complex Carla, Wiggly Wilma. I KNEW immediately which one I was! hee hee Any guesses?? I scored soooo high on Perfect Paula it wasn't even funny! You know the one that needs organization, structure, loves teaching manuals, schedules and a *stickler for detail*. But take me outside my circle and I freeze or is it melt? LOL...

Pefect Paula and Social Sues make great companions! Social Sues like people, fly by the seat of their pants, love adventure and projects, are creative, and usually can't find their purse, glasses or keys! Thats my husband too, he's Social Sam.

I have a friend who is a Social Sue. She and I get along great! I organize her schoolroom, she planned a FUN field trip for the kids! It was soooo much fun because of her participation and light hearted spirit! She is spunky and doesn't mind standing outside of her comfort zone... Sound a little bit like you? EH!!!

So we need ALL kinds personalites! How boring life and teaching would be if we only had Perfect Paulas:( :rolleyes:

Tina

TinaTx
05-18-2004, 08:08 PM
Wow TinaTX you have some amazing ideas! I'm trying to figure out how to print/save your post so I can set up some of them too! Hope you don't mind.

Thank you to everyone who has answered my endless questions. I have not made up my mind yet. My hubby thinks I'm crazy, he's against it but he hasn't read your posts yet! I'll keep you posted...no pun intended....
Jennifer:) [/B][/QUOTE]


Jennifer......

Please ..use them....I don't mind! A new homeschooler told me recently *Isn't every idea either beg,borrowed or stolen?* YEP YEP I agree:D A lot of my ideas come from simply a need. Others are rearranged to suit homeschooling.

I agree with Jackie too about having dh support. Afterall our family is not a *one-parent decision making panel*. DH didn't fully understand, but he knew that training the character of the children was just as important, if not more! This can not be done by peers or by other individuals the early years when they are being molded. This was an ongoing process that needed our guidance on a *daily basis*.

So many people, including teachers, come from ps to homeschool trying to set up their school and yes *philosphy* like the system they just left! So I would encourage you to examine the reasons why you want to homeschool and analyze those against a ps education. What are your priorities?

I discussed with dh that I would be taking on a full time job. Would he be content with a little less for supper? Clothes that might be a little wrinkled here or there? A clean house, but maybe books everywhere?

We prayed and weighed out what would be the most benefical for OUR children. We didn't find that we had any allegiance to a flawed SYSTEM. We were responsible to give our children the BEST education that we could. That included both the physical and spiritual man! So we quickly came to the conclusion that only WE could do that, not peers or strangers, no matter how nice and competent they were!

Was my first year easy? FAR FROM IT!! We had numerous evenings when dh came home and found everyone in tears! Thats normal. Any new change like a new born baby or marriage will have such times. We could spend a huge amount of time on talking about each of our first year!

Not to make light of handling a 3yo and 7yo (because I have both):p , but in the whole scope of what we as homeschooling parents are doing that is not a big issue! I mean this with all respect. The reason I say this Jennifer is because circumstances are temporary at best, ever changing. Two years ago, I did homeschooling in the afternoon ONLY while my 1 yo napped! The *creature* was into everything! I did homeschooling in a room my first year that I moved a huge couch into so that I could put my feet up as I nursed. I wanted DS #1 to have good handwriting so I wanted ergnomically correct height of table/chair. So he worked at table, while I nursed baby. The baby fell asleep on the couch and we continued on!

So what you envision now is VERY temporary! To coin a old phrase *this too shall pass*.

That is the wonderful element of homeschooling that I dearly love. Homeschooling mercifully adjusts to the *going ons* in our life! That could be a marriage, adoption, death, sickness (long term and short term), moving, vacations,new born,college graduation, job changes,etc.

So I guess the 2$ question is what are you and your dh priorities?That will help you to decide if this is the right choice for your family.

Tina

Deena
05-19-2004, 01:39 AM
Wow Tina,

That Social Sue certainly does sound familiar!!!:D You're right, we each have our style, I just wish my style included a bit (LOT!) more on the organizational competency area! :p

Brooke
05-19-2004, 10:03 AM
I'm with ya, Deena!!! :D

Hey, Tina......what are the common attributes for Complex Carla and Wiggly Wilma? And which Cathy Duffy book was this taken from? I am only familiar with her curriculum reviews....not that I've purchased the book, just, uh, previewed it in the book store....;)

TinaTx
05-19-2004, 08:36 PM
Hey Brooke....

The workshop was 2 parts and each part was 45 minutes long. I have them on cd. I have a Wiggly Willy and I was beating me head up against a wall!

I was listening again today to the first part, and am in the process of listening to the second part. I will go back over them in the next couple of days and make notes when she talks about books because I got away from the convention without getting the handouts.

I think the name is actually Competent Carla/Carl and not complex when I listened again today. I do remember on Wiggly Wilma or Wiggly Willy that they are the chilren that drive Perfect Paulas and Perfect Pauls up the wall. She said a lot of kids are this when they are younger and can change into another one. Its more commmon to be two, but not have 3 different learning styles. YOu should know definetly by 8, but some moms can tell as early as 6 yo. Before that, you can't really tell.

She did say her Wiggly Willys needed to stand at the table and not sit down. She moved the chair and he stands at table because he has to scratch, stretch, yawn, itch and move:D She said that when she reads to him, she has to learn to hold the book real close to her face, because he is sooooo distracting and irritating to her (she is a perfect paula). He rolls around on the floor! But when she ask him back what she read, he repeated the WHOLE paragraph. She went into more detail about how they like to do projects and not have a lot of structure. Also at break time, they need something active to do. She gives her son a chore like empty the trash, then he as like 5 or 10 minutes to play. BUT NO sitting down watching tv.

She gave an example of what its like to be this way: She told everyone in the room to hold their breath while she talked. She talked, talked and talked! EVERYONE is about dying!..Then she said ok. BREATHE! Well thats what its like for Wiggly Wilma and Wiggly Willys. They WANT to please their parents and be obedient but its not their nature, its like sucking the life out of them...

She had a lot more excellent examples! I know she mentioned Cindy Tobias. In her book she gives examples of what they need to do while you read. She said sweep. Its quiet so they can hear while you read.

I will listen to the cd and jot down notes, and then maybe post them here under a thread called learning styles or something.

They are EXCELLENT cds and worth the $$ I spent to buy them!

Tina

Anonymous
05-20-2004, 06:59 AM
Tina, is there a place I might pick those tapes up at? I know our convention sells most of their tapes after-the-fact for those members who didn't get to attend. That wiggler sounds alot like Fayhte!!! I usually let her color while we read, except on Mondays when the girls have to fold clothes.

Kathe
05-20-2004, 08:11 AM
I need a clever, descriptive phrase for MY teaching style ... but there aren't many good adjectives starting with "k" :p

Kathe

TinaTx
05-20-2004, 07:33 PM
Jackie...

Yes....the cds/tapes are the ones available after the show! I have never bought after the show(meaning when I left and came home) so I don't know if you can still get them. Since it still relatively soon after and since the group is a pretty big regional group, they may still have some.

The name of the group is FEAST in San Antonio, Texas. BTW..Don't you have a brother in San Antonio?;) hee hee That just might work out.Also FEAST is one of the most active groups in Texas. SETHSA the other one in Houston is big too, but somehow the one in San Antonio seems to have a lot more going on, activity wise.

The workshop session was titled *Understanding your child's learning styles* Part 1 and Part by Mary James and the other lady's last name was Broadway.

I REALLLY like the information...so much more useful than just saying *visual, auditory and kinsthetic*.....

Tina

abcTammy
05-20-2004, 08:15 PM
:rolleyes:TinaTX,
I hope you find time to post more~please! I know I have a WW and PPaula here. Any tips on how to work with them together.
I'd love to hear the cd myself.
Tammy :D

Anonymous
05-20-2004, 08:50 PM
Tina, you have SOME memory!!! My "Little Brother" lives in Boerne. Hey....think I could convince DH that next year I *NEED* to attend the conference there? I could fly down all by myself, stay with my little brother, meet you and She.... I'd even miss the conference up here..... Oh well! Don't think I can make it fly by DH..... Is there a web site I might order from, do you know? I know the first magazine edition after our conference here is pretty much devoted with Convention stuff, including a form for ordering tapes.

Deena
05-22-2004, 12:05 AM
Jackie,

If you go, I'm goin' too! That'd be great, huh?! :D

TinaTx
05-23-2004, 12:49 AM
Jackie.....

I tell you the *little things* I remember are sooo ridiculous! :rolleyes: :D at least imho. I can't remember the balance in my check book, but I have ALL my friends phone numbers memorized! Go FIGURE! and I email most of them:p

Oh well, Boerne...Boerne is gorgeous! We lived in Canyon Lake (about 20 miles from there) for about 2 years! Its a beautiful area with the lake close by!

Wouldn't that be nice sometime to coincide your visit with db and a homeschool convention too? Bring Deena along and we'd have a great time at the homeschool fair:D

Well hopefully this website will help. Its the website of the group in San Antonio. Its one of the most active in Texas.

http://www.homeschoolfeast.com/ I'm sure you could email them directlty, and ask them. They are real helpful.

Tammy, don't worry I will post about learning styles. I have been listening trying to figure out how to condense it to one manageable post :eek: without being everyone to sleep:rolleyes: :D I will listen to tips on how to manage them. I just remember her saying again to keep your style in mind. When you teach your style, you have the *patience* to deal with a perfect paul, if your social sue or visa versa. She also talked some more about making your child go outside of their comfort zone. Teach them another style gently, or at least introduce it...Anyway, I'm still listening.....and taking notes.

Tina