PDA

View Full Version : public school a "right"?


Jackie
10-03-2006, 06:14 PM
For those of you who say that homeschooling will naever be illegal here, take a look at this.....

http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/200609251.asp

Ava Rose
10-03-2006, 06:34 PM
Wow. I always figured it would come to this. Thanks for sharing. It makes me so angry to think of parental rights being taken away. I certianly do not want the state to raise my kids!

rhassinger
10-03-2006, 07:00 PM
The HSLDA item is heavily spun (by lawyers who need to justify their existence) to suggest a threat against homeschoolers. The actual proposed ammendment has absolutely nothing at all to do with homeschooling. Chicago has a very segregated public school system, with some of the nation's best schools in white neighborhoods and some of the nation's worst schools in the nonwhite neighborhoods. Jackson would like to give the nonwhites in Chicago, or anywhere else, an equal slice of the public education pie. If this legislation is any threat to homeschoolers then it would be an equal threat toward Catholic and other private schools. It's extremely unlikely to threaten anyone who does homeschooling, and if it does then the lawyers for the private schools are going to come to the homeschoolers' defense to avoid setting a legal precedent.

Ava Rose
10-03-2006, 07:13 PM
If this legislation is any threat to homeschoolers then it would be an equal threat toward Catholic and other private schools. It's extremely unlikely to threaten anyone who does homeschooling, and if it does then the lawyers for the private schools are going to come to the homeschoolers' defense to avoid setting a legal precedent.


I thought of that after I digested what I read. Good point, if is say so myself. :D

Would this lead to a slippery slope perhaps??? Of the decline of parental rights???? Turn into a right for schooled education?

Parental rights seem to be in jepordary regardless of this. Once that happens than it's anyone's guess what the government will do next. That is what I fear. The day my kid has the right not to be punished for an offense he or she does not deem as worthy of punishment unless otherwise agreed upon by a jury of his or her peers. LOL. Who knows! Kids rights are on the rise and parents on the down. Any law that condones that is one I am against.

Emma's#1fan
10-03-2006, 07:31 PM
The law would take the rights out of parents hands. This is why HSLDA is on it, not because they claim it effects homeschooling directly. It is all about a "child's right" to choose as the child sees fit, not the parents. It takes control from the parents. HSLDA is on it because if this law passes then it does effect homeschooling when a child decides he/she does not want to homeschool and would rather attend public school when the parent knows that it is best for the child to be at home. It is an unfair proposal that will take away parental rights. I am glad HSLDA is on it.

Emma's#1fan
10-03-2006, 07:43 PM
Something else that stinks about this is it will effect whether a child wants to attend church or not, whether or not a child wants to be Catholic, Baptist or whatever religion and spiritual belief the parents have for the home. I am not completely anti-government but I am completely against the government in the home. This is where the rubber meets the road. Although it may not be a problem for some parents, it will be for others who happen to have children who tend to have more of a rebellious nature.

Jackie
10-03-2006, 08:28 PM
Yes, it could effect private schools, and I believe that HSLDA pointed that out in the article. I have seen "proposed amendments" that have "nothing to do" with something later used against people. One case in point is the racketeering laws. These were designed to fight organized crime, but were later twisted against those that protested abortions, with no connection to organized crime. Who is to say that this law won't be twisted at some future date?

Another situation arose quite a while back. They were trying to pass legislature, can't remember if it was state or federal, saying that people had to be certified to teach EACH SUBJECT they taught. It was supposedly designed specifically for private schools who had people teaching areas they weren't certified in. On the surface that sounds good, but HS'ers were concerned. Would that mean that a parent homeschooling their high schooler would need certification in EVERY AREA that student was studying? Homeschoolers called en mass, and the law was defeated. Not long after, I read an article in the NEA's magazine. It lamented how these misguided homeschoolers were able to get a WONDERFUL bill defeated, that all these private schools would continue with sub-standard teachers, etc., when it really had nothing to do with them.

What the article did NOT say was that someone tried to introduced language in the bill that specifically EXCLUDED homeschoolers. The authors of the bill would NOT allow that language to stand. So what does that tell us about how the bill would be interpreted?

As Ava Rose said, it's a slippery slope I don't want us to start going down. And I, for one, appreciate diligence HSLDA puts into keeping abreat with legislation. I may not agree with everything about them, but I wouldn't be without them!

Deena
10-04-2006, 10:45 AM
You guys said what I was thinking. No matter how "pure" the original design of this bill, it WILL be twisted in the future if it is ever passed!