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johnegood
04-05-2008, 03:19 AM
I read a post which got me thinking about the overall homeschool movement from a statistical point of view.

And I paraphrase/quote a post from homeschoolonline.org (I'm too new to be able to put in the link for real)

Do most homeschoolers seem to start in schools and try to homeschool as a second choice when the schools don't work. They homeschool not out of principle but as a pragmatic problem solving move. This pragmatic group totals 61% of those surveyed. (There were 9% who had “other reasons” and 30% who were homeschooling for religious reasons.)

I’m now really curious about these questions.
1. Did most homeschoolers start in schools and then switch?
2. Would they have stayed in school if the experience had been better?

sloan127
04-05-2008, 05:42 AM
We have had kids in public school for 30 years. (Our oldest is 35.) He should have been homeschooled, but back then I had never heard of hs. Our youngest two children are 15 and 9 and we are in our second year of homeschooling them. They liked public school okay but were not learning. One is very shy and was falling behind because she wouldn't speak up and tell the teacher she needed help. The other one needs more one on one and extra time to master things. Homeschooling gives them what they need. Our twins did great in public school but I think they would have loved homeschooling. One teaches public high school and one is a social worker and they totally agree with their younger sisters being homeschooled. Our other two sons will graduate this June. One hates school and one is dreading leaving school. He is mentally handicapped and wants to graduate and then start over! He loves people and doesn't want to leave his friends. I probably would have left my girls in public school if they had been learning and enjoying it. I only looked into it out of frustration. I loved what I found and jumped right in with the help of the people here at the Homeschool Spot. I do not plan on sending them back.

Jackie
04-05-2008, 07:17 AM
My children never attended school, nor do I plan on having them do so. Most of my friends that homeschool did not start in school. I am wondering about the place that did the survey. If they're a primarily secular board, then they will get those results. But if the same survey was given at the CHEO conference, the very opposite would be true. That's because CHEO is generally considered a Christian conference. The true statistics would be somewhere between the two.

kbabe1968
04-05-2008, 08:00 AM
We chose homeschooling before we had children so ours was not based on a failed school system. :D

KrisRV
04-05-2008, 08:11 AM
I homeschool, because I can and I love being with my children.

MamaBear
04-05-2008, 08:23 AM
We have always homeschooled. We felt that we could give our kids an excellent Christian education, something that is not possible through public school.

We also know quite a few of the ps school teachers and personally, we would not let them watch our dogs for a day, let alone educate our children.

One teacher, with whom I know very well, told me that she favors the "blonde" kids and she hassles the hispanic kids. I asked her why and she stated that she doesn't like *&**%%$ and she admits it, she's a bigot!

Actressdancer
04-05-2008, 08:27 AM
My oldest is in Kindergarten this year, so obviously are choice had nothing to do with him having been to a school that failed him.

Once upon a time DH thought that we would homeschool the boys until Jr. high or so then send them to public school. But in the last two years of research and planning (and my being a sub for a few months this Winter) we've come to the conclusion that home will be school, barring unforeseen circumstances, until the leave for college.

And while we are dedicated to a Christian education for the boys, our choice to homeschool really had not a lick to do with our faith.

MonkeyMamma
04-05-2008, 09:39 AM
The only reason my oldest went to public school first was because I didn't really know about homeschooling. I now have been hs'ig my two girls for two years and my youngest will never step foot inside a school. If I had known about hs'ing before my oldest never would have gone to school.

sixcloar
04-05-2008, 10:25 AM
My oldest (ds) went to public school for two years. And, although I didn't think the ps system could give them what I could, I wouldn't say I homeschool because the ps system failed them. (I do think that it would have failed my dd though.) I homeschool because I feel that it's what is right for my family. Christian values are part of my reasoning, but not all.

jacqlyn00
04-05-2008, 10:55 AM
I started homeschooling when my son was starting First grade. It took a few bad weeks of public school until I began looking for alternatives. Thats when I stumbled upon homeschooling and homeschooling forums. I never thought it was something I could do, until I researched it more.
I'm so glad I homeschool now.

Mrs. Mommy
04-05-2008, 02:59 PM
DH and I had been thinking about HSing for a few years but just didn't think we could do it. What finally pushed us to make the choice was DD's medical situation and the fact that she was missing so much school and falling even more behind. When we saw how much she liked it and was learning we knew we had to do the same for our DS. He was having problems with being bullied and was really starting to hate school. The "social" situation even caused the school to ask that we hold him back in 2nd grade as he was not mature enough to move on. (He just didn't like to be hit, pushed, talked about, etc) Pulling him out was the best thing we did for him!! We wish we would have started HSing earlier in the ball game.

3angelsmom
04-05-2008, 04:14 PM
I knew I was going to homeschool before my first child was ever born. I love to teach and wanted nothing more than to be the one to watch my children grow in their education.
We've homeschooled since day one, none of my children have ever been in a public school classroom.

seekingmyLord
04-05-2008, 07:23 PM
I decided it before I had the child.

Deena
04-06-2008, 04:01 PM
I homeschool, because I can and I love being with my children.Me too, Buddy!

mamamuse
04-07-2008, 12:23 AM
We considered homeschooling before we ever had kids. Public schools were just never an option for us. When Zach was old enough to start kindergarten, my hubby deployed to Iraq for a year. I didn't feel that I could handle homeschooling during a deployment (while taking care of a very active toddler, too).

So we enrolled him in private school. He attended there until the middle of third grade. His little brother went for one year, for pre-K. There were several reasons for pulling them out; the main one being that our oldest was being bullied and the school didn't want to do anything about it.

DH had always wanted to homeschool; it just took me a while to believe that I could do it. We really do enjoy it now, and I'm glad we did it.

daddys3chicks
04-07-2008, 06:14 AM
well, we will begin hsing in the fall, and my girls are in PS now - grades K & 4. I have felt led to hs since Katie was in K, but it took God longer to get to DH!

Both girls are doing great in PS, but I just want as much time with them as possible. And, I want them educated with a certain view. I guess I just want the best for them and that is hsing.

sgilli3
04-07-2008, 07:07 AM
My kids have experienced both ps and hs.
They both went to school and they loved it, couldn't have been happier.(couldnt fault the school at all)
Then we moved to Dubai, and I hs using the Distance Education school from our local state in Oz.
We all enjoyed it, but when we returned to Oz, they went back to school.
When we realised we would be moving back here, I took them back out of school, to hs again (to try + make the transition easier)

While we live here we will hs, but we havent decided about when we return home (kids love both ways...so we will see what happens)
I do prefer the Reggio Emillio way of teaching , so maybe if we could find a school with the same philosophies, that may be the way to go.
Time will tell

eyeofthestorm
04-07-2008, 08:13 AM
Okay, my DH & I both attended public schools, did well, and enjoyed it very much. Our children are being homeschooled because the structure of public (or private) school simply doesn't work for our family. (We travel, and you can't just pick your kids up and flit off for a few weeks with little notice when they are enrolled in school - not fair to them or the teacher.)

Now, until we made the decision, we did have growing concerns about issues in the public school system. That's not to say we couldn't have found a school (public or private) we would have been happy with, but it would have taken some shopping around, and most likely, relocation.

That said, the more we've learned about homeschooling, the more committed we are to it for its own sake. I believe if our circumstances were to change, we would remain a homeschooling family.

amylynn
04-07-2008, 10:19 AM
I chose to homeschool because even at 2 I could tell my daughter was so advanced for her age that putting her in school would be a very bad thing for her. I think if I had had my son first we probably would not be homeschooling. I'm so glad we are and can.

Amy

Birbitt
04-07-2008, 10:22 AM
Our Children will be homeschooled right from the start, beginning this fall. However I guess you could say that we have chosen this partly because of a failed school system, but not because of an experience there rather because of the reputation of the schools and my personal observation of the schools. Also my own personal experiences in school have much to do with our decision, as well as our religious beliefs. So we have chosen to home school for many reasons and the primary one is not the failing school system. Our primary reason is our love for our children and the fact that God has given us these children to raise not to raise until they are 5 and then let the school finish the job!

Ava Rose
04-07-2008, 12:57 PM
I had never heard of anyone being homeschooled until a friend of mine decided to homeschool her kids. Even then I thought it was kinda kooky. lol. Then another friend homeschooled her child. So, that made me look more into homeschooling as an option. Until that point I thought my only two viable options were private school or public school.

When my first dd, hit kindergarden age, my dh and I decided that we wanted to try homeschooling. It was a fairly casual decision to be honest. We felt that we could be a vital part of our child's education even if we decided on public or private schools. However, we felt that we knew our child better and could provide better individual attention. So, we decided to try it out for a year and see how it went. Well my dd is going into 5th grade and my ds into 3rd grade and we are still homeschooling. My kids have never been to school. I am not anti-school. I just feel that I can provide a more tailor made and focused education at home. Especially being Christian, we feel that for our kids we are doing the right thing. We have not been failed by the school system. I do see the problems in the school system and that does encourage me to continue to homeschool.

chicamarun
04-07-2008, 01:27 PM
Interesting question and everyone will give you a different reason.... which is why I think it's a wonderful opportunity (and I can't believe I said that after the awful day #1 we had today after a 2 week break!)

In VA we have SOL's and for 4 years I saw my son deteriorate in school - coming home saying he was stupid and such, more so in the 3-4 grades.

My daughter repeated 1st grade and they still had her behind. For her - she felt she NEEDED a boyfriend!! Ugh...

It was only supposed to be a year to get them "caught-up" but I feel more and more like it will go on longer.

lovinhomeschool
04-07-2008, 01:56 PM
Hi
There are alot of reasons why I homeschool, religion being one of the major ones.

However, my kiddos have never seen a ps mainly because my hubby and I are both apart of a failed ps. We were both pulled out of school not long after it became legal in our state (me 3rd, him 6th) and we were both homeschooled through high school. I still live in the same town I grew up in and see nothing good coming from our ps, so my kiddos will never go to it.

WIMom
04-07-2008, 03:01 PM
Hi
We homeschool because we feel it is in the best interest of our son at this time. He attended public school kindergarten last year. We had disagreements with the school and school district and they had issues with our son. It wasn't a good match. My son is a quiet, sensitive and bright child. His fine motor skills aren't the greatest. He also struggles with perfectionism, which causes him to either not try things or cry in frustration.

First off, we didn't send our son to preschool, so that was seen as a odd. We were told at kindergarten registration that kindergarten starts with the teaching the alphabet, so kids didn't really need to know anything before they entered. We thought that our son would be ahead if that was the case. He was already reading 25 or so sight words and counting way above 100. In reality though the kindergarten teachers did expect that the kids came in knowing many things. The teachers especially wanted kids to already know how a classroom is run, how to do work/projects independently, how to draw a house and tractor, how to color things with the "right" colors and how to play games with their classmates. We were told by the principal that "Kindergarten is the new first grade". Another thing was that my husband and I chose a 1/2 day kindergarten option for our son (the parents' "choice" in our district). Apparently, that was the wrong choice, so our son's teacher disliked us and him from the start. Just about every day that I picked up our son at lunch time I was asked when he was coming the whole day.

There were bullying incidents that my son was the victim of at school as well. It really bothered him. He would beg and cry not to go to school. He would say that he had headaches and stomaches etc.

By December of the kindergarten year the teacher invited my husband and I to early intervention/child study team meetings, where we had to talk about how our son behaved at home versus school. We had meetings with 15 professionals around a large table. The school said that our son cried too much, could not follow multi step oral directions, was unaware of his surroundings and had problems with fine motor skills. A consultant for the state's educational system heard what I had to say and said that it sounded like my son was a divergent thinker. He said that my son's frustrations sounded like his brain was working faster than what his hands could keep up with, so he would cry. I agreed with that.

In another smaller meeting with a few staff members (minus consultant guy) told my husband and I that our son should attend the full day kindergarten or he would be retained! They said that our son needed social skills class. Also, they suggested that we have our son tested for an autism spectrum disorder. My hubby and I did let our son attend the full day kindergarten. In our eyes our son's behavior wasn't getting much better. He still cried and begged not to go to school. There was also the new issue of lunch time. One of the reasons the staff wanted our son to go a full day was so that he could get used to eating in the cafeteria and enjoy more social time with peers. Oddly enough the lunch period was only 20 minutes long with a mandatory "no talking" time the last 10 minutes. Our son felt so rushed and was so scared to say a word that he ended up not really liking lunch at all. He would come home saying that his food got stuck in his chest. He begged to be back at home to eat a calming lunch. My hubby went to the school board to speak on behalf of the parents and teachers who disliked the short lunch period. The response we got back was that is just the way it is and it won't change in the near future. The only fix the superintendent said was if she extended the school day. I thought 8:30-3:30 for little kindergartners was long enough!

At the final child study team meeting last year the big group of 15 professionals got together and realized that our son was doing great now that he attended the full day of K. It was really strange. The teacher claimed that all of our son's problems disappeared in just a few short weeks of attending a full day of kindergarten. The staff also finally believed me about my son teaching himself how to tell time. My son had become his teacher's clock watcher. He would say, "Mrs. P, it's 9:03 and we still aren't in music class! We are late!". I think that annoyed his teacher though.

My child, my husband and I were unhappy with the local public school, so we thought homeschooling would be ideal this year. It's been difficult, but very rewarding!

Emma's#1fan
04-10-2008, 02:57 PM
My older two went to and graduated from public school. We knew when our last was born that she was going to be homeschooled. After what we went through with our middle daughter and the system, forget it! For reasons of faith to academics, or lack of, in the public school, we know we made the correct choice.

Birbitt
04-10-2008, 03:03 PM
Amazing isn't it our children can't do anything right when we do what we feel is best but when we give in to the professionals suddenly our child is perfect.....yet nothing has changed except that we now keep quiet and let the "professional" decide what is right. I'm so sorry for you and your son's experience and I'm glad that homeschooling is working for you.Hi
We homeschool because we feel it is in the best interest of our son at this time. He attended public school kindergarten last year. We had disagreements with the school and school district and they had issues with our son. It wasn't a good match. My son is a quiet, sensitive and bright child. His fine motor skills aren't the greatest. He also struggles with perfectionism, which causes him to either not try things or cry in frustration.

First off, we didn't send our son to preschool, so that was seen as a odd. We were told at kindergarten registration that kindergarten starts with the teaching the alphabet, so kids didn't really need to know anything before they entered. We thought that our son would be ahead if that was the case. He was already reading 25 or so sight words and counting way above 100. In reality though the kindergarten teachers did expect that the kids came in knowing many things. The teachers especially wanted kids to already know how a classroom is run, how to do work/projects independently, how to draw a house and tractor, how to color things with the "right" colors and how to play games with their classmates. We were told by the principal that "Kindergarten is the new first grade". Another thing was that my husband and I chose a 1/2 day kindergarten option for our son (the parents' "choice" in our district). Apparently, that was the wrong choice, so our son's teacher disliked us and him from the start. Just about every day that I picked up our son at lunch time I was asked when he was coming the whole day.

There were bullying incidents that my son was the victim of at school as well. It really bothered him. He would beg and cry not to go to school. He would say that he had headaches and stomaches etc.

By December of the kindergarten year the teacher invited my husband and I to early intervention/child study team meetings, where we had to talk about how our son behaved at home versus school. We had meetings with 15 professionals around a large table. The school said that our son cried too much, could not follow multi step oral directions, was unaware of his surroundings and had problems with fine motor skills. A consultant for the state's educational system heard what I had to say and said that it sounded like my son was a divergent thinker. He said that my son's frustrations sounded like his brain was working faster than what his hands could keep up with, so he would cry. I agreed with that.

In another smaller meeting with a few staff members (minus consultant guy) told my husband and I that our son should attend the full day kindergarten or he would be retained! They said that our son needed social skills class. Also, they suggested that we have our son tested for an autism spectrum disorder. My hubby and I did let our son attend the full day kindergarten. In our eyes our son's behavior wasn't getting much better. He still cried and begged not to go to school. There was also the new issue of lunch time. One of the reasons the staff wanted our son to go a full day was so that he could get used to eating in the cafeteria and enjoy more social time with peers. Oddly enough the lunch period was only 20 minutes long with a mandatory "no talking" time the last 10 minutes. Our son felt so rushed and was so scared to say a word that he ended up not really liking lunch at all. He would come home saying that his food got stuck in his chest. He begged to be back at home to eat a calming lunch. My hubby went to the school board to speak on behalf of the parents and teachers who disliked the short lunch period. The response we got back was that is just the way it is and it won't change in the near future. The only fix the superintendent said was if she extended the school day. I thought 8:30-3:30 for little kindergartners was long enough!

At the final child study team meeting last year the big group of 15 professionals got together and realized that our son was doing great now that he attended the full day of K. It was really strange. The teacher claimed that all of our son's problems disappeared in just a few short weeks of attending a full day of kindergarten. The staff also finally believed me about my son teaching himself how to tell time. My son had become his teacher's clock watcher. He would say, "Mrs. P, it's 9:03 and we still aren't in music class! We are late!". I think that annoyed his teacher though.

My child, my husband and I were unhappy with the local public school, so we thought homeschooling would be ideal this year. It's been difficult, but very rewarding!

Emma's#1fan
04-10-2008, 03:06 PM
Amazing isn't it our children can't do anything right when we do what we feel is best but when we give in to the professionals suddenly our child is perfect.....yet nothing has changed except that we now keep quiet and let the "professional" decide what is right. I'm so sorry for you and your son's experience and I'm glad that homeschooling is working for you.

I think this is why so many parents are homeschooling and it is growing so fast. We are tired of the system thinking they know what is best for OUR children. Parents want to claim what is theirs. I think people are realizing that the public school is so much more than just an education. There is a huge influence and it isn't always positive.

jillrn
04-11-2008, 07:33 PM
Homeschooling since birth for my kiddos!

Dianna
04-13-2008, 10:32 AM
We decided to homeschool before our daughter was born. First reason being, that we wanted her to have a Christian education. Second reason was the school system here. We live in a small farming town, and only have one elementary school here, and it's a terrible school. The teachers don't want to deal with the kids, they just want a pay check. 60% of the students in the elementary school here are on Ritalin, because the teachers complain that the children talk, or get up during class. With some of the students, they went so far as to turn the cases over to the state, and demand that they put the kids on Ritalin, or they would remove the children from their homes, and place them in foster care. True story, people. Awful, isn't it? My cousin was the mother of one of these kids. The boy was pretty active, but not enough to be on Ritalin. The teachers here don't want to teach children, they want zombies. Not saying that ADD children are monsters, or anything like that, I was a Ritalin kid, back in the mid-late 70's parents didn't know the side effects, thank God , I didn't have any. Also, we had been hearing of complaints of many parents, saying that their children were , and still are beig mistreated by the teachers. Nothing seems to be done about it. Iv'e seen small children in first and second grade get off of the school bus , using the most foul vocabulary, words you would expect to hear in a bar. Little girls are dressed in street walker chic. I'm not a religious fanatic, but with all of that, there is no way we would send our daughter there. My little girl LOVES to talk, and nobody is going to force me to put her on Ritalin, just to keep her quiet. She's five, and in first grade, just about to finish. She gets excellent report cards, all A's and B's. Had I waited for public school, we would have to wait til next year to put her in. , because of her birth date. There are no programs available for advanced students here, Yvonne would be bored ot of her mind. The reasons for homeschooling with us are endless. I have no regrets that she never went to school, she never went to preschool either. My sister in law , who is a public school teacher, thought I wasn't able to teach her properly without a degree, she came to test her while she was in Kinder. Just to prove her point. She was astonished, Yvonne was at their public schools second grade level, at four years old. :D Just last week, she heard her reading , and said she reads better than most of her fourth grade students. Since then, she has never made another stupid remark about us homeschooling. Sorry for my rambling, I know I went a little off topic. I needed to vent a bit. Iv'e been getting alot of people making those remarks, and I have to just grit my teeth, and shut up. :x Too late to make a long story short, but those are some of the reasons we chose to homeschool, best of all, Yvonne loves it, and I love the opportunity to be with her, and watch her learn. She has freedom to go outside and explore, we go on nature walks, library trips, etc. When we please. Can't do that in public school. Every trip becomes a field trip. It's fun, and she gets one on one attention. No public school teacher can love her like her mom and dad, and teach from the heart, going out of their way to ensure they get the best education, and most information possible. The list goes on, and on, so I will stop here. Hope that explains it a bit.

Blessings,
Dianna

homeschooler06
04-16-2008, 03:40 PM
DD8 did PS until halfway thru 1st. I didn't and still don't like the principle. I hope when they finally decided to combine the elementry schools, he's out of the job. Anyhoo being a military family and havng a crazy schedule for the next couple years to come, homeschooling fits our lifestyle. I just can't see pulling a child out of school with 3 months to go, go into a new school for a month and a half, then summer, go back to school for 3-4 months and then a new school for another 3 months and then move to another new school for the remainder of the year and the move again during that summer. Did you follow that? It's nice having their education is somewhat steady. I don't have nothing against schools if we stayed in one place and I can get involved. So unless hubby stays in one spot for the next 12 years and we are in an awsome school zone, we will be a military homeschooling family.

rmcx5
04-16-2008, 04:22 PM
Our kids have only been in a Dept of Defense school (technically public but not really...still some sheltered-ness there...PTL).

Anyway, with every military move since our oldest was born, I contemplated HSing but when it was time for her to start K, Daddy was in Iraq and I had 2 youngers ones....so off to the DoD school and it is and was a great school for them. I was active in their classrooms and on PTO. But Daddy is home after several tours to the "sandbox" and when we moved to VA, I researched HSing a lot more thoroughly than ever before. Surprisingly, I didn't have to convince hubby (much). I did have to convince him (after talking to the DoD Principal) that we didn't have to have transcript from Abeka, etc (although not a bad thing but unnecessary with our youngings ages).....plus, since Daddy had been gone 3 of 4 years, I did NOT want to have to live and die by the VA SOLs and their attendance policies. Add to that, we bought a nice house but in a terrible school district (some good schools but not many).....so we're not schooling for religious reasons although I definitely think God put it on my heart before this move to research it more.

hope40
04-17-2008, 04:55 PM
I live in VA too and the SOL's caused so many problems! People don't realize that they threw out the Stanford 9's the official achievement test and that grades on report cards do NOT matter for advancement.

In other words, the SOL's are the ONLY thing that passes or retains a child. So what, right? It's a test.

They should be held back if they can't pass it. Well, the problem is many of the answers on the test are subjective. The questioning is muddled (think Everyday Mathematics muddled), so it is VERY easy to not comprehend neither the question or answer.

So, you have straight A students on their report card doing summer school or being retained based on SOL's. Why don't the schools just throw them out? Aren't the local districts in charge of their own schools? Nope. They are not and they must make a certain score on the test to receive state funding.

All about the money, and it was a MAJOR reason for us choosing to homeschooling.

Blessings,
Trishy

Laja656
04-24-2008, 12:04 PM
I didn't read through all the replies.. so forgive me if I missed a follow-up question in there somewhere.

I'll just give you our situation in a nutshell --- but questions are welcome if anyone's curious about anything:

My kids have never attended public school. My oldest in nearly 10.

I chose to homeschool simply because I don't like the schools in this area for various reasons, & I think the 'no child left behind' thing is screwing everyone over.

Religion has played no role in my choice to homeschool. If anything, it is one of the few reasons the thoughts of placing my kids in public school occasionally and briefly cross my mind. Being non-Christian in rural Texas.... it's a little difficult to find "support groups" that are supportive of us.

WIMom
04-24-2008, 01:05 PM
"& I think the 'no child left behind' thing is screwing everyone over."

I also think that NCLB is not helping the public school systems or the children!

johnegood
07-05-2008, 04:26 PM
Thanks everybody for your comments. It's really interesting to read all these stories. I was just doing some reading on this idea of "Accidental Homeschooling", people who started with their kids in school but then, thru disappointment switched to homeschooling. It rang very true to me. Especially the part that although many parents seem to start homeschooling by a series of accidents and in an emotionally conflicted way, they tend to get totally coopted by the life style and benefits and be big homeschooling advocates after awhile.

Elizabeth77
07-06-2008, 05:28 PM
I homeschool because it's a choice I made for them when I was in High School (because I hated it so much and my hs'ed cousins and friend were doing so well). It wasn't until about 7 years after high school that I actually had a kid, but I had already decided to plan on it that far in advance. Right after we got married, I started talking my husband into it before we had kids. Took about 1.5 to 2 years to convince him that it would be ok! Over time he's become just a gung-ho about it as I am.

I did, however, end up sending my oldest to ps Kinder last year because I was about to have a baby, and kind of freaked out a little bit and thought maybe I wouldn't have the time for her and her school as much as I should. It was a BIG MISTAKE. Wish I hadn't done it. At least she's home now, nothing majorly traumatic happened to her while there, and she's NEVER going back. I say it's a big mistake though b/c the stuff she learned there was stuff I had already taught her, so she was really bored there. She could have sat at home and learned nothing this past year, and still be where she was at at the end of the year. . . . .:roll: Even if I had done a little something with her while having the baby, it still would have been more than the school gave her. And she went to the "good school" in our area. . . . .:shock:

We ended up taking her out 3 weeks before the end of the year because I was just too fed up to wait out the whole year THEN take her out. We figured, "we're taking her out after this year anyway, and we're sick of 5 year old child leaving at 8:30 am returning at 4:30 pm, have STUPID homework, have cranky child on my hands each evening b/c it's a long, boring day. . . . ." Why send her and put ourselves through that when she's learning nothing? She learned more those last three weeks after we took her out than she did the whole time she went to school!

pecangrove
07-06-2008, 06:51 PM
Our son has never been to ps, and God willing, he never will be. This decision was based on many things, including the state of our PS here, the general policies/attitudes of the school system in this country, the lack of any moral compass of many of those that attend and work in said PS, and just the fact that we enjoy it and can do it.
So unless our situation changes dramatically, we will continue to HS DS and our soon-to-be-born until God directs us differently.

RoadRunner
07-07-2008, 03:50 AM
Both hubby and I had a horrible time in ps. DH has ADHD and our son is the same, so though we HAVE to have him in ps here in Norway, this is the last of it. As soon as we move to the US he will be hs, hopefully through high school. PS has been horrible, with teachers more intent on "disciplining" the parents than the kids...

Ava Rose
07-07-2008, 08:31 AM
I did not read all the answers but I will answers the questions asked in the orginial post.

My kids have never been in school. Did the ps system play a part in that? A little. However, even with an awesome ps about 3 minutes from me, I still homeschool. For us it is a conviction both from a spiritual point of view and an educational point of view. After homeschooling for years now, I am very happy this is the choice we made.

So, no, I have never had the ps fail me. Wasn't waiting around for that and wasn't interested if that would actually happen. I am not anti-school...but I perfer my children learning from a method that is not taught in the ps system.

crazymama
07-07-2008, 02:57 PM
I want to answer too ;)

When my oldest was an infant I started reading up on homeschooling.. I knew that is what I wanted for my child. He was "homeschooled" for preschool.. through lots of play and reading tons of books. We enrolled him into K, with the intentions of me returning to work part time when he started school... instead, I got pregnant again... so I knew I was going to be staying home. All the time we spent playing and learning had put him well advanced compared to his peers. For 2 years we put up with constant calls from teachers that he was acting up.. silly boredom things. We begged for him to be moved up a level grade wise, we begged for gifted classes, we begged for him to be given extra work or to be allowed to read a book after he finished the task at hand. We were not so politely told "We simply can not do that, see there is this law called 'No Child Left Behind', and we can not allow your son to move ahead of his peers because of that"... yes we were told that.. scarey huh? We felt that the whole NCLB law did nothing more than slow the faster learning students down, and hold them back from their true potential.

We pulled him out after 1st grade... and have never looked back. I now have 2 younger kiddos who will never be sent to school.

kyzg
07-07-2008, 05:32 PM
For me, school was a positive experience and I did well. Up until I taught (long-term sub, 2 years) in PS, I thought HSing was for oddballs, etc. But that subbing experience is what led me to HS. By the time I was ending the 2-year stint, I found out I was expecting my first baby and I had already decided that I'd HS my kids. It was a combo of what I saw academically and socially that led me to my decision.

wyomom
07-07-2008, 08:54 PM
Me too, Buddy!
:DThis is the biggest reason that we decided to homeschool. I think my dds are some of the coolest people to be with. Part of my descion was also based on my own school career. We live in the same school district that I went to school. I did ps until my junior year. Then my parents decided to hs. It was the best experiance of my life. Our faith weighs on our choice of curriculum but we mostley decided to hs for the freedom it offered us, as well as being able to spend time with our girls. They are only children once, and for so short a time. I don't want to miss any of it.:D

Actressdancer
07-07-2008, 09:03 PM
Our faith weighs on our choice of curriculum but we mostley decided to hs for the freedom it offered us, as well as being able to spend time with our girls. They are only children once, and for so short a time. I don't want to miss any of it.:D

That's a pretty accurate description of why we HS, as well. So many people assume that since we are Christians who Homeschool we do so for religious reasons. I won't pretend that moral issues are an added benefit for us, but they were by no means the reason we chose/choose to homeschool.

But we use a Christian curriculum because, if they're home anyway, it might as well be a faith-based education. lol.

kyzg
07-07-2008, 11:39 PM
It really does blow my mind when I think of how much time PS takes kids away from their parents. . . and at such an early age. And to think there are proponents of mandatory preschool!!! The time does fly way too fast.

brodysmom1
07-08-2008, 09:45 PM
I am new to homeschooling, we'll be starting our first year next month. My son is 10 and just completed 4th grade at the local public school here in Maryland.

We finally decided to homeschool out of total frustration with the ps. My son is a very cheerful, happy little guy, who also struggles with frustration. If things aren't exactly the way he thinks they should be, he gets frustrated and starts crying or gets "bossy". At home, we've found that the best way to deal with it is to nip it immediately and if he goes in to melt-down mode, to send him to his room to calm down. Usually by the time he makes it to his room, he's ready to come back down and talk :roll: It's really a non-issue at home because his father and I don't allow the behavior and he responds well to the discipline and can usually calm down and deal with whatever is making him frustrated.

At school on the other hand, there is a complete lack of discipline and they were completely unprepared to deal with issues that in my opinion, were fairly normal and age-based. No one in my family has a problem keeping Brody in line, no one in my church has a problem keeping him in line. Children need discipline. I was 10 once myself (I wonder about these teachers though) and in my experience, a child will get away with what he can. He is, after all, only a child.

From Kindergarten through this school year we have gone around and around with his succession of teachers, fielding phone calls at least weekly about Brody's "behavior". This year it came to a head and I was receiving so many calls that I was starting to feel like I just didn't like my child anymore, it had me so stressed. We were called in to have a meeting with the vice principal and their counsellor and were pretty much ordered to have him evaluated by a child psychologist. Now mind you, this was over things like calling out without raising his hand, keeping his desk messy, not paying attention...in general, things that children do. So I took him to a child psychologist with the only goal being to get the school off my back. Guess what the diagnosis was? He's 10. That's it. He's a kid, he'll grow up.

The next week his teacher asked me to come and sit in class and "see what his behavior is like at school". So for two days I sat in the back of the class, didn't say a word, and just read a book. Brody was the most well-behaved child in the class. After the second day, the teacher came up to me and said "I can't believe it, he didn't put one foot out of line the whole time you were here!" I replied "yes, that's because he's afraid of me, perhaps if he were afraid of you, you would have the class under control". Now when I say "afraid", I don't mean my child fears being around me, I mean that he is afraid of getting in trouble with mom. He respects me, he does what he's told, and he behaves like a normal, goofy, loving little boy who occasionally gets in trouble like any other kid. There is no discipline at the school, no respect for adults, no control. And it's getting worse every day and we can see that "out in the real world".

It was at that point that I decided that he would never set foot in the public school again. I WILL raise a child who respects adults, and learns to control himself and solve his problems in a Christian manner. Since we made the decision, a huge weight has come off and we have been enjoying the heck out of our child again. And he is excited about it too, because he certainly wasn't happy being in trouble all the time for being a child.

*Oh, and as far as academic standards...when I had to tell one of the teachers that no, a bat is not a kind of bird, I knew that there were some big problems!

wyomom
07-08-2008, 10:57 PM
*Oh, and as far as academic standards...when I had to tell one of the teachers that no, a bat is not a kind of bird, I knew that there were some big problems!
:D I have to chuckle and interject here. This so reminds me of my dmil who insisted to my dds that the white man forced the indians to live in tepees. This is the woman who questions our choice of education for the girls. My dh responded to her by asking for her documented proof of this.:lol: She of course could not produce any.:roll:

Jackie
07-09-2008, 07:02 AM
:D I have to chuckle and interject here. This so reminds me of my dmil who insisted to my dds that the white man forced the indians to live in tepees. This is the woman who questions our choice of education for the girls. My dh responded to her by asking for her documented proof of this.:lol: She of course could not produce any.:roll:

My main instructor at Bowling Green became upset at me because I can't roll my tongue. It's genetic, and I know for sure I can't do it, because I always envied those who can. (BTW, Carl has the gene, and all three of my kids can do it!). When I told her this, she became REALLY upset with me. Later, I was in ANOTHER class dealing with "anatomy of the speech mechanism". We were discussing muscles in the tongue, and he asked how many could roll their tongue, then addeded, "But if you can't, don't worry about it. It means you don't have the gene." So I asked about documentation for that. He thought I was questioning HIM, so I explained that another instructor had gotten upset with me. "Who was that?" he asked. I told him. He sighed and said, "FIGURES!!!" So ignorance among teachers continues even into college!

brodysmom1
07-09-2008, 07:57 AM
Jackie, you are now responsible for my son playing with his tongue all day...I can roll mine but I honestly don't know if my hubby can (he's out of town). I showed Brody and it's going to drive him nuts practicing :D

Jackie
07-09-2008, 11:18 AM
Jackie, you are now responsible for my son playing with his tongue all day...I can roll mine but I honestly don't know if my hubby can (he's out of town). I showed Brody and it's going to drive him nuts practicing :D

Anything to help, lol!!!

homeschool2boys
07-09-2008, 01:37 PM
We homeschool for a lot of reason but the main ones are that I can't even describe how much I hate the ps system here. The other reason is that I want my kids to have an actual education instead of that half warmed over junk they feed the kids at the ps. My OS graduated from public high school this year and I was horrified that he could not pass the algebra ˝ placement test from Saxon. I don’t even want to get into how awful of a job they did with my special needs son.

I still have one son in a public high school. He wanted to stay and graduate although it goes against my better judgment. I would like to pull him out of there sometimes. I let him stay because I felt it was his choice.

I have many other reasons, like the liberal agenda that our public school pushes onto the kids. I can’t tell you how many times this year I have been livid at the slanted way that some of the teachers teach. Not only that, but the lack of control they have at that school. Several crimes have been committed at that school and it gives me all the more reason to want to homeschool. I just think the kids deserve better than that public school system.

JPtheGreat
07-09-2008, 01:45 PM
Going thru Child Psycology course myself and learning from the people in the bible has given me the conviction that I should educate my own DC. Reasons?

Elementary and Jr high are formation years for children and giving them solid foundation esp moral values should be from their parents and not teachers nor maids etc
In the bible Joseph was hs by his father (given solid foundation) and when he was sold to become slave in Egypt, he trust God (followed what has been thought by his father even though he was away from Dad) he succeeded eventually from a slave to the Pharoah's (king) right hand man! He saves his family too from famine.
I would be happy that after guiding and nurturing my DC, they will not waver from obeying God.
I suggest hs to my DH even before my eldest DD started Grade 1 but DH disagree. (Not sure whether he has no confidence in me or he thinks nothing wrong sending DC to PS since everyone else does). Deal will be I hs till Kindergarten only.
I had no choice but to sent DD to PS. Year after year I pray to God for DH to change his mind. Year after year I throw the idea for discussion.
I started to see -ve effect to my DD, traumatised by fierce teacher. I felt Im closer to my DC when I hs them. Understand them too. I could teach them following their pace.
Then came second DD, had to be sent to PS. My heart ached when I see them tired, not enthusiastic to learn, learn nothing much (ratio of 1 teacher to 50 kids in class compared to 1 to 1 if hs), phobia of missing out any homework cos teacher never fails to punish but fail to forgive! and the list is long....
Next, 3rd DS. Still praying...
Finally, God answered prayer. Dh has to work in Dubai and the family has to stick together. DH recognises the flexibility of hs schedule so finally, he said yes.
Yes! I now hs my DC trying hard to de-school them. They love it!
The list goes on and on for the reasons to hs.

MelissainMi
07-17-2008, 11:11 AM
Ive always homeschooled Madison..it works with my work schedule and I get to enjoy o ur time together more. I didnt have a child so someone else could raise her. My sister also hs's her kids and that inspired me alot!!!

2CalvertKids
07-17-2008, 01:51 PM
My story, in a nutshell.

I had my first son at 19. I was a child myself and had nothing but selfishness - my career, my free time, my life. I wasn't a bad mom, but I also thought nothing of putting my son in daycare while I finished school (college, I did get my BA) worked late hours at my job, and so on. On day, when my oldest was 3, we were driving to daycare and he looked at me and said, "Mommy, you live at your work, daddy lives at his work, and I live at my daycare." I would be lying if I said this didn't affect me. But, at that time, I had no means to do anything about it. I was actually just months from divorcing his dad at that time, and I needed my job. His dad was not the type to support a SAHM either.

Fast forward two years, I was divorced, remarried and pregnant with #2. My oldest was barely 5 and started Kindergarten in ps. He was ADHD, and they forced medication in GA...especially after he stabbed another child accidentally in the head with a pencil. :( I didn't know homeschooling existed. I mean, I knew some "really weird" people did it, but hey, that wasn't for me.

Then, God took us to GA (oh how I know God was preparing me for where I am now...even then) and my dh befriended a man named Ed. Ed was a very spiritual man who deeply touched my husband and while in GA, my dh was saved and baptized. Then Ed invited us to his home to meet his family and have dinner. His wife was a SAHM, like me (I quit work when ds 2 was born and never went back) and she HOMESCHOOLED her kids. Her kids were LOVELY in every way! They were intelligent, polite, articulate, social, friendly, full of manners and just really awesome kids. Immediately, my thoughts of homeschoolers turned from "only weird people do that" to "wow, that is really great, but I could never do it..."

Enter ds 2...LOL and his complete sheer will to be homeschooled. Since he was small, he has told me he didn't want to go to school, he wanted to be here with me. That will pass, I thought. Just a phase. Nope. We tried homeschooling pre-K and I was just LOST. We were using books from wal-mart. No wonder! So I enrolled him in a church pre-K two days a week last fall. He went. He hated it. Cried and begged me not to take him. Finally, I gave in and realized this was NOT a phase...and, not to mention, he had forgotten most of what he knew by BEING IN PRESCHOOL. When he went, he was writing his name, knew the alphabet and all the letter sounds, and could count to and identify numbers to 10. He came home in May after preschool had ended for the summer and he knew very little of that! So that was IT. Ds2 was being homeschooled.

But my heart begged me to keep trying to persuade ds1's dad to agree to hs'ing which he had previously blatently refused to allow. I prayed, I had the church pray for us. And God answered that prayer...he changed his mind and told me to give it a try. :)

I will say that my oldest ds always had a hard time in ps. Not academically...but otherwise due to his adhd. And 3rd grade was a nightmare. He had a bully that woudl tell ds that he would bring a gun to school and kill him and nothing was done by the school at all! So, even if I hadn't homeschooled this year, my son would not have been going back to that school. We were looking at private school until my ex changed his mind.

So, to answer your questions:

1. Did most homeschoolers start in schools and then switch? We did with one, not with the other.

2. Would they have stayed in school if the experience had been better? Maybe so, but I am thankful it wasn't because it allowed me to see just how little he was being taught in school and gave me this wonderful opportunity to be his teacher. :)

FreeSpirit
07-18-2008, 02:14 PM
I had decided a while ago that I wanted to homeschool my kids, but when I met my fiancé, he already had a kid in public school because he had to work and couldn't homeschool or do daycare and his ex is pretty irresponsible. But he always had the dream of homeschooling his kids.

This year she will be in second grade and we've decided that this will be her last year in public school. We are nervous with all the psychiarists in schools and their garbage trying to put kids on psych drugs—did you know their latest campaign is to get kids AGES 0 TO 3 years on psych drugs? They are "testing early" for mental disorders and are calling it "prevention." No way will my DD 7, who is just enthusiastic, be tested or suggested for ritalin or anything similar. I don't believe the PS have "failed" us personally, but we both believe they will with their lack of knowledge on how to teach, their "dumbing down" of the material, and the other kids on psych drugs that might bring a gun to school.

I hope the children we have will never have to deal with ps. It will take a lot to get our finances to a place where we can homeschool next year, but we are going to pull it off. And if a psychologist even LOOKS at our DD, we'll yank her this year!

armywife2Bill
07-19-2008, 02:39 AM
Our conviction has always been non-public education. Our kids have went to our church schools and have been homeschooled. The reasons we homeschool seem to change every year, when we talk about either putting them in Christian/Church school or homeschooling. When my oldest started school we were in Germany, our church didn't have a school and the closest school that was "of like faith" was about 45 minutes away, so we felt we were left with no other option than to homeschool.

So, we are homeschooling now for much the same reason as when we were in Germany. There is a school of like faith only a few miles from us but it would cost us $20,000 a year for all 3 of our kids to attend there, yes, I said $20,000 a year!!! So, there is NO way we can even begin to even entertain the idea of putting them in school here.

So that's our view with a little story.

hmsclmommyto2
07-21-2008, 10:53 AM
Here's the story of how & why we started hsing:
I was a single working mom until my dd was in Kindergarten. So, she went to day care, then preschool, then kindergarten in ps, while I worked to support her. I had no idea homeschooling existed. I knew that before public schools people had educated their kids, I just didn't realize it was still going on. Anyway, my dd has always been very advanced. By the time she started Kinder, she was reading fluently, could count way past 100, knew all her shapes & colors (beyond the normal ones they teach at that level), etc She was not allowed to do anything at her level. Even though she was reading, she was expected to sit there with the rest of the class while they spent a week learning the letter A. Needless to say, she was bored out of her mind. I had asked the teacher to let her read or give her more challanging work to do and was told that was not possible. To give her something to do, the teacher asked dd to help the other kids learn. I didn't send my child to school so she could teach, I sent her there to learn. On top of that, the other kids picked up on the fact that dd knew the answers every time the teacher asked something & quickly realized that she knew a lot more than they did. They started to bully her. It started as just verbal but by mid-year had become physical (remember, we're talking about 5 year olds). The school refused to do anything about it.
During dd's kindergarten year, I gave birth to my ds. He was 3 months premature & I was not about to trust that a daycare would be able to give him the extra care & attention he needed. So, I had become a SAHM. After ds was born, I started looking into different options for dd (since I was in the hospital on bed rest since before Thanksging & dd had been living with my dad & step-mom during that timne, I couldn't really look into options until after ds was born). With me not working & us living only on my dh's income, private school was not possible. I found some books on homeschooling at the library. I read every one I could find, and did tons of research online. I brought it up to dh, who wasn't so sure it was a good idea. His concern was that I'd be taking on too much with already having a preemie at home to care for. He finally agreed to try it when dd came home from school & told us that a boy in her class (again we're talking 5 year olds) had put her in a choke hold! At this point the school year was almost done, so we had her finish out the year. I used that time to get used to ds's schedule, learn as much as I could about hsing, and plan for 1st grade.
By the end of kinder, dd refused to admit she knew anything. If you asked her something she had known for years, she would say "I don't know" or "I forget." She didn't want to learn anything at all because she was convinced that being smart was a bad thing (thinks to being bullied for being smart). Even though she had been a fluent reader & loved reading before she started kinder, by the end of the year she refused to pick up a book. Her desire to learn had been crushed right out of her.
On top of the way she was treated and the fact that she's very academically advanced, she also has severe combination-type ADHD. So, I knew ps would continue to fail her if she stayed there. After kinder ended, we contacted the district & told them that she would never be returning to their schools.
We've been hsing since. She's now in 5th grade & doing great. We still struggle sometimes with her not wanting to learn & we're still working on building her self-esteem back up. For the most part though, she's good with school. She will take it upon herself to learn about things that interest her. I sometimes still have to force her to start studying something, because she will automatically assume it's boring & she won't like it. Usually, after the first week, she's really into it (& will continue to learn about it on her own after we're done studying it for school). My ds will never set foot in a ps.
So, yes we started hsing because the ps failed our child. We can provide a much better education, in an envirnment that's actually conducive to learning. We continue to hs because it's what's best for our kids. PS, at least here, are not equipped to deal with children who are "gifted" & have ADHD (which describes both my kids). They barely deal with a child who is one or the other, they deffinitely can't handle a child that's both. If I had known hsing was an option & had been able to do it from the beginning, I would have. Without realizing it, I was hsing part time anyway. The reason she knew so much going into school was because of the stuff we did in our time together. We'd play games to learn the letters & sounds, play counting games, talk about everything we saw, go to museums & zoos (when we had the time & money), and we read a lot of books together. So, I guess you could say we were hsing all along (at least part time), but started to officially hs after a horrible experience with our local ps.

Laja656
07-21-2008, 11:01 PM
I’m now really curious about these questions.
1. Did most homeschoolers start in schools and then switch?
2. Would they have stayed in school if the experience had been better?


All of my kids have always been homeschooled & not for religious reasons.

I homeschool because I attended this ISD for 10 yrs growing up & I know how they operate. My kids will never attend public school as long as we live here.

I suppose if MY experience in this school had been positive, I would have enrolled them. But it wasn't, and the only change they've made is for the worse, so mine will remain in homeschool.

Jackie
07-22-2008, 06:36 AM
What is an ISD?

mamamuse
07-22-2008, 11:54 AM
I like reading the replies to this thread. I replied ages ago, but I didn't answer the second question, as to whether they'd have stayed in school had the situation been better.

I'd probably have to say yes to that, because I just didn't believe I could handle HS. If things had gone well, I'd probably still have both kids in school.

I used to say that we'd take HS'ing one year at a time, with a return to school always an option. But now I'm not so sure about that. They never did go to public school, but I'm no longer convinced that private school is any better. As they get older, they might attend a few science or math classes at a homeschoolers' academy nearby. But putting them back in all-day school? I just don't think so. We're having too much fun at home!